Facebook Icon Youtube Icon Twitter Icon Flickr Icon Vimeo Icon RSS Icon Itunes Icon Pinterest Icon

University of Maryland-Phillips Collection Book Prize Goes to 'Sculpture at the Ends of Slavery'

July 31, 2019
Contacts: 

Alana Carchedi Coyle 301.405.0235, Hayley Barton 202.387.2151 x235 

 

COLLEGE PARK, MD and WASHINGTON, DC – The University of Maryland Center for Art and Knowledge at The Phillips Collection has awarded its latest University of Maryland-Phillips Collection Book Prize to the manuscript "Sculpture at the Ends of Slavery". Written by Caitlin Beach, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Art History at Fordham University, the manuscript addresses sculpture’s relationship to slavery and abolition in transatlantic contexts.

The University of Maryland-Phillips Collection Book Prize supports publication of a first book by an emerging scholar presenting new research in modern or contemporary art from 1780 to the present. The winning books are published by the University of California Press, in collaboration with the University of Maryland and The Phillips Collection. The winning author also receives a $5,000 cash prize. This is the ninth book prize awarded by The Phillips Collection since 2008, and the second prize jointly awarded with the University of Maryland. 

“I feel honored that the selection committee has recognized my work for this award. It's inspiring to have the chance to be a part of conversations about race and modern culture already ongoing with the University of Maryland and The Phillips Collection book series and I look forward to the new directions in which this will push my thinking and writing,” said Beach.

According to Beach, Sculpture at the Ends of Slavery examines the place of sculpture in a transatlantic world contoured by the wide-reaching economy of American slavery and the international campaigns mounted to end it. Focusing on the production, circulation, and exhibition of a range of busts and statues by artists including Hiram Powers, John Bell, Edmonia Lewis, and Francesco Pezzicar, the manuscript shows how the medium stood as a highly visible but deeply unstable site from which to interrogate the politics of slavery across geographies including New Orleans, London, Freetown, Boston, Florence, and Philadelphia.

“It is wonderful that the University of Maryland-Phillips Collection Book Prize discusses such a powerful aspect of the history of slavery and abolition," said Klaus Ottmann, Ph.D., Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Academic Affairs, The Phillips Collection. “Caitlin Beach’s book Sculpture at the Ends of Slavery will insert the arts in a way we have never seen these topics explored.”

“We are pleased to recognize Dr. Beach’s profound work with the book prize award,” said Mary Ann Rankin, Senior Vice President and Provost at the University of Maryland. “Publishing Dr. Beach’s innovative manuscript on sculpture’s relationship to slavery and abolition is a perfect example of the mission of our partnership with The Phillips Collection–advancing scholarship and innovation in the arts.”

Beach’s research and teaching at Fordham University focus on American and European art of the long nineteenth century. She received her Ph.D., M.Phil and M.A. in art history and archaeology from Columbia University. 

ABOUT THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. As one of the nation’s top producers of Fulbright scholars, its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners and 59 members of the national academies. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

ABOUT THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

The Phillips Collection, America’s first museum of Modern art, presents one of the world’s most distinguished Impressionist and American Modern art collections. Including paintings by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Mark Rothko, Alma Thomas, Pierre Bonnard, Georgia O’Keeffe, Vincent van Gogh, Richard Diebenkorn, Henri Matisse, and Jacob Lawrence, among others, the museum continues to actively collect new acquisitions, many by contemporary artists such as Wolfgang Laib, Per Kirkeby, Whitfield Lovell, Zilia Sánchez, and Simone Leigh, and. Its distinctive building combines extensive new galleries with the former home of its founder, Duncan Phillips. The Phillips’s impact spreads nationally and internationally through its highly distinguished special exhibitions, programs, and events that catalyze dialogue surrounding the continuity between art of the past and the present. Among the Phillips’s esteemed programs are its award-winning education programs for educators, students, and adults; well-established Phillips Music series; and sell-out Phillips after 5 events. The museum contributes to the art conversation on a global scale with events like Conversations with Artists and the International Forum. The Phillips Collection values its community partnerships with the University of Maryland—the museum’s nexus for academic work, scholarly exchange, and interdisciplinary collaborations—and THEARC—the museum’s new campus serving the Southeast DC community. The Phillips Collection is a private, non-government museum, supported primarily by donations.