Facebook Icon Youtube Icon Twitter Icon Flickr Icon Vimeo Icon RSS Icon Itunes Icon Pinterest Icon

UMD Continues Action Plan to Shape a More Welcoming and Inclusive Campus

February 27, 2018
Contacts: 

Katie Lawson, 301-405-4622

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - The University of Maryland released a video today with updates on its ongoing action plan to shape a more welcoming and inclusive campus. 

UMD is committed to creating a campus free from hate, one where our community feels physically safe and safe to be who they are. The university has undertaken many actions to accomplish these goals, and significant work is still underway.

  

Additional information on the university’s actions include:

  • Partnered with the Anti-Defamation League on trainings for the President’s Cabinet, Deans and university leadership. 
  • Established and charged the Joint President/Senate Inclusion & Respect Task Force to consider how best to nurture a climate that is more respectful and inclusive of all members of our campus community, stands against hate, and reaffirms the values that define us a University. The task force plans to report its findings in April 2018. 
  • Developed a streamlined protocol for hate-bias incident response that will ensure a coordinated response, provide support to impacted community members and ensure transparency with the campus community. In addition, UMD is in the process of forming a Hate-Bias Response Team to assist victims of hate and bias on campus, and hiring a Hate-Bias Response Program Manager in the Office of Diversity & Inclusion. 
  • Implemented a university-wide survey on campus climate to help us better understand the experiences of students, faculty, staff, and administrators on our campus with respect to diversity, inclusion, equity, hate, bias, well-being, and belongingness. We will use the findings from this research to help inform and shape policies and practices that promote a safe and welcoming campus. 
  • Developed an “African-American History and the University of Maryland: A Campus Landmark Tour” that focuses on the historic and contemporary presence and contributions of African Americans to the physical and social infrastructure of the university. The walking tour is grounded in the history of the institution and the State of Maryland - conveying the complexity of racial politics and slavery as it has impacted the state's flagship institution. 
  • Established a UMD Student Leadership Council for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion to help focus and improve collaboration between students and administration. 
  • Completed mandatory training in implicit racial bias for the entire force of 100+ sworn UMPD officers and installed additional surveillance cameras in and around campus buildings. 

The University of Maryland Police Department (UMPD) has 100 police and auxiliary officers serving our community:

  • We have over 400 cameras on and off campus that are monitored 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.  
  • There are more than 300 blue light phones on our campus where the caller will be put in direct contact with a UMPD dispatcher. 
  • We offer walking safety escorts that can be requested at any time of the day, year-round.  
  • The UMD Guardian Safety App serves as virtual walking escort service, automatically contacting UMPD if you do not arrive at your expected destination.   

For more information on UMD’s work on these important issues, visit https://umd.edu/weareumd.

 

UMD Admissions Statement on Participation in Nonviolent Protests

February 26, 2018
Contacts: 

Jessica Jennings, 301-405-4618

The University of Maryland's Office of Undergraduate Admissions announced today: 
 
"We recognize that students benefit from civic discourse and dialogue.  Non-academic disciplinary action from high school will not affect a student’s admission to the University of Maryland if they are engaged in peaceful and respectful protest."

UMD Statement on UMPD Charges Announced Today

February 26, 2018
Contacts: 

Katie Lawson, 301-405-4622

Statement from university spokesperson Katie Lawson:

This is a story of "if you see something, say something," and we are grateful for any reported information that helps keep our UMPD police officers safe. 

This individual has been issued a denial of access to campus.

UMPD's news release is available at go.umd.edu/fiy

University of Maryland Named a Fulbright Program Top Producing Institution

February 22, 2018
Contacts: 

Jennifer Burroughs, 301-405-4621

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- The University of Maryland has been recognized as a top producer of Fulbright U.S. Students and Scholars by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Listed among research institutions, UMD is one of only 16 schools to be represented in both categories. In addition, the university is also the top producer of Fulbright scholars in the state.

For the 2017-2018 academic year, eleven students and alumni accepted Fulbright student grants to travel across the globe to conduct research and/or teach english abroad for individually designed projects; and seven scholars, faculty & staff members were selected to conduct research, lecture, and/or consult with other scholars and institutions abroad through a variety of international program awards. 

Read more about UMD’s Fulbright winners

Each year, the Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually. Roughly 1,900 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals. More than 380,000 "Fulbrighters" from over 160 countries have participated in the program since its inception in 1946.

The top Fulbright-producing institutions are highlighted in the Feb. 18 online edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education

 

UMD Creates Online Tour Commemorating African-American History and Contributions to Campus

February 21, 2018
Contacts: 

Jessica Jennings, 301-405-4618

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at the University of Maryland has created a new online tour exploring the history of African-Americans at the university and their contributions to the campus community. The tour, which features 17 locations on campus, is available at umd.edu/blackhistorytour.  

Photo of nyumburu cultural centerIn telling the history of the African American experience on campus, the tour begins with the university’s founding when Maryland was a slave-holding state. It charts the path of the legal battle to desegregate the campus led by Thurgood Marshall, civil rights advocate and the first African-American Supreme Court justice, and the trailblazers who were among the first black students to attend the university. The tour includes landmarks that celebrate the contributions of African-Americans to our campus and community, including the David C. Driskell Center, Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Building, the Harriet Tubman room in Stamp Student Union, and Frederick Douglass Square.

“All of us need to learn this important history,” said University of Maryland President Wallace D. Loh. “These stories of African-American struggles and contributions span the history of our campus and our nation. We need to make hem part of our shared memory.”

“Our historical legacy is an important part of the campus climate for diversity,” said Roger L. Worthington, UMD’s chief diversity officer. “We approached Dr. Nickerson to help us with this project and planned the launch for Black History Month as a way of acknowledging the struggles of our past and charting a path forward in building a more welcoming future. The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is pleased to support this important initiative as we continue to work together toward unity, respect and inclusion.”

The tour was developed using the expertise of Kim Nickerson, assistant dean, equity administrator and diversity officer in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, who took a critical look at the university’s history to identify and curate key moments that were shaped by African-Americans. The tour draws on university archives, reports by campus colleagues and other sources.

“Like our country, the University of Maryland is continuously evolving to live up to our core values and ideals. The evolution includes telling a more complete history of our campus by acknowledging the painful past, but also celebrating the triumphs,” said Nickerson. “We hope this work serves as a source of affirmation and inspiration and that it invites other diverse voices to share their stories.”  

Guided tours will be offered later this spring, which are being developed by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and UMD doctoral student Nana Brantuo.   

The University of Maryland is committed to creating a safe and inclusive campus for its entire community. In addition to longstanding programs on diversity, the university has invested millions into new trainings and initiatives, including hiring a hate-bias response program manager and implementing a streamlined protocol for hate-bias incident response, rolling out a campus-wide climate survey, and launching the Center on Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education. In addition, the university is comprehensively reviewing policies through a task force with the goal of shaping a more equitable, diverse and inclusive campus.  

 

###

About the University of Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

UMD Awarded $1.4 Million to Design New Treatment for PCBs, Heavy Metals in Stormwater

February 19, 2018
Contacts: 

Anjanette Riley, 301-405-2057

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Environmental engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) were recently awarded a $1.4 million grant from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to design a modular stormwater treatment system for Department of Defense (DoD) sites. Conducted over three years, the research will target for the removal of three environmental contaminants: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and copper.

DoD has for years worked to remove or cap contaminated sediment in waterways that receive stormwater runoff from their sites, including the Puget Sound and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. But the grant to UMD is among the first efforts taken by SERDP, a partnership between the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, and DoD, to remove harmful chemicals before the runoff leaves a DoD site.

The project is led by Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Birthe Kjellerup. Together with co-investigator Allen P. Davis, UMD postdoctoral scholar Devrim Kaya, and several undergraduate students, along with collaborators from the University of Washington-Tacoma, Morgan State University, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Baltimore-based planning and design company Biohabitats, Kjellerup will design a treatment system ready for future field testing.

The final design could be applicable at industry sites and in communities across the country.

PAHs are created during the combustion of carbon-based materials—everything from wood to gasoline to meat—and exist in high concentrations in the coal tar sealcoat used to protect parking lots and driveways. Like PCBs, which were commonly used in electrical equipment, plastics, dyes and other industrial materials prior to being banned by Congress in 1979, this group of chemicals has been shown to cause cancer and disrupt hormone and reproductive systems in animals. Fish and other aquatic animals can also suffer neurological, reproductive, and sensory challenges when exposed to higher levels of copper.

The research team will identify wood chips, compost, and other natural media that trap these contaminants and can be layered to obtain the highest removal rates. Each layer will be chosen based on its ability to effectively treat high flows of water with minimal maintenance. DoD site managers will be able to mix and match the layers to create the optimal “treatment train” for a location’s contaminants and climate.

To boost the effectiveness and sustainability of the system, the researchers will explore ways to seed the media with microbial communities capable of immobilizing copper and biodegrading PCBs and PAHs into harmless byproducts. The team will also develop a passive sampling strategy to monitor reduction levels.

“The challenge will be creating stable biofilms for regions with different rainfall patterns so the bacterial community isn’t washed away,” said Kjellerup, adding that the project is among the first to examine how the accumulation of potentially toxic metals in a treatment system affects microbial activity.

“PCBs especially are incredibly long lasting and difficult to degrade,” said Davis. “If we are able to design a system that reliably degrades PCBs, that would increase its sustainability and extend the value of the project.”

The team will design their system using flow data and stormwater samples collected at naval installations in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. and at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Washington. As a first step, they will measure PCB, PAH, and copper concentrations and map the relationship between contaminant loads and the sizes of particulate matter.

Throughout the testing and design process, researchers will work closely with engineers at Biohabitats, who have successfully implemented large-scale, nature-based treatment systems throughout the country, to ground-test findings and ensure that the final design is cost effective and aligns with industry best practices.

“We hope this project can be a seed that grows into future collaborations with the University of Maryland,” said Christopher Streb, an ecological engineer and bioworks practice leader at Biohabitats. “Stream restoration, living shoreline work, or any other landscape modifications for ecological services would benefit from a closer relationship between academia and practitioners.”

 

###

About the University of Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

 

 

Two UMD Science Majors Win Prestigious Churchill Scholarships

February 13, 2018
Contacts: 

Abby Robinson, 301-405-5845

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- Two seniors at the University of Maryland have been awarded 2018 Winston Churchill Scholarships, which offers full funding to pursue one-year master’s degrees at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. 

The scholarship—valued at $50,000 to $60,000—covers all educational fees and provides living and travel allowances. Nationally, 15 students in the sciences, engineering or mathematics receive Churchill Scholarships annually. Since its inception in 1963, only two UMD students previously received the award, and this is the first time two were selected in the same year. Both UMD students are enrolled in the university’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences (CMNS). 

Photo of Christopher Bambic

Christopher Bambic—a physics and astronomy dual-degree student, who is a Stamps Banneker/Key Scholar and a member of the University Honors program within the Honors College—will pursue a Master of Philosophy degree in astronomy. He plans to study the connection between microscale plasma physics and macroscale astrophysical phenomena.

 

 

 

Photo of Yousuf Khan

Yousuf Khan—a biological sciences major specializing in cell biology and genetics, who is a Banneker/Key Scholar and a member of the Integrated Life Sciences program within the Honors College—will pursue a Master of Philosophy degree in pathology. He plans to study programmed ribosomal frameshifting in eukaryotic organisms. This mechanism allows organisms to pack a larger amount of genetic information into a relatively short sequence of RNA.

 

 

Following their time in Cambridge, both Bambic and Khan plan to pursue doctoral degrees in the United States and ultimately pursue academic careers.

“We are extremely proud of Christopher and Yousuf, who have both managed to combine excellent academic records with outstanding research achievements,” said Gerald Wilkinson, interim dean of CMNS. “They are superb representatives of the college. Their success in such a prestigious competition is testimony to their abilities and the education they have received at the University of Maryland.”

For more information on Bambic and Khan, please visit https://go.umd.edu/fhu

 


Photo credit: Faye Levine

 

### 

About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

UMD Researchers Find Gene that May Greatly Increase Strawberry Production

February 13, 2018
Contacts: 

Samantha Watters, 301-405-2434

COLLEGE PARK, MD. – Researchers at the University of Maryland have identified and isolated a gene that is directly involved in the way strawberry plants grow, spread and produce fruit. 

With the ability to turn this gene on and off to produce runners (a long horizontal stem ideal for producing young strawberry plants for sale) or flowers (ideal to produce fruit) and a greater understanding of how to control this process, this work has the potential to greatly increase strawberry productivity.

Strawberries are a $3 billion per year agricultural industry in the United States alone. However, the demand has only been growing over the years. There is infinite potential to enhance this industry further by understanding the mechanisms behind breeding and production of strawberry plants. Julie Caruana, a postdoctoral researcher, under the direction of Zhongchi Liu, affiliate professor with the department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture and professor in the department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, has come significantly closer to this level of understanding by finding this gene and honing the ability to produce runners. “We know at least one gene that is definitely involved, and going forward, we can determine what other genes are involved and how they interact,” said Caruana.

There are many environmental factors that affect flowering and runnering behavior. These include temperature and day length, which is why strawberries typically produce runners in the summer months and flower in the fall, winter, and spring months. Controlling this trait and understanding the process, genetically and environmentally, is very important to the strawberry industry. “When you are trying to fruit strawberry plants, turning off runner production would really help the growers,” explains Mike Newell, Senior Faculty Specialist and Horticultural Crops Program Manager at the Wye Research and Education Center, who works with strawberry growers. “Depending  on the strawberry production system used, runner production may or may not be desirable, and they may have to be manually removed. Nurseries on the other hand would love runners so they can sell more tips to growers. Controlling this would certainly help growers and nurseries from different sides.”

This work not only has the potential to improve strawberry production with currently popular varieties and growing methods, but could increase yields even more with the popularization of different varieties that are less viable at the moment due to runner behavior. “Most strawberry plants in use today are known as June bearers, or plants that only produce berries once per year,” explained Dr. Liu. “Since strawberry plants are only kept for two years due to significant production drop off with age, farmers only get two harvests from a typical June bearer. Ever-bearers on the other hand can produce multiple harvests each year, increasing overall strawberry yield. But they are relatively unpopular at the moment for farmers and at nurseries because they are poor runner makers - it is difficult to propagate ever bearers. If we can find a way to induce runner production in ever-bearers, the market for these strawberry plants could open up, increasing strawberry yield and having major impacts on production.”

The discovery was published in Molecular Plant.

###

About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

UMD Receives Grant to Develop Cultural Literacy Curriculum

February 13, 2018
Contacts: 

K. Lorraine Graham, 301-405-6127

COLLEGE PARK, Md-- The University of Maryland recently received a $750,000 grant from the National Security Education Program and the Institute of International Education to develop the Flagship Cultural Initiative (FCI). Cultural awareness is a critical part of learning a language, living abroad and working in an increasingly global economy, yet no clear methods for teaching and evaluating it exist. Through the Flagship Cultural Initiative, a team of flagship program directors and scholars will develop publicly available, online materials to foster cultural literacy. Staff will develop materials for students who are studying Arabic, Chinese and Russian, as well as a separate set of materials in English for students in any discipline. 

“The faculty and staff in SLLC and the Language Flagship programs in Arabic and Persian are recognized for their expertise and creativity in providing immersive learning programs,” said ARHU Dean Bonnie Thornton Dill. “This grant will allow them to use that expertise to help students, regardless of their home institution, develop linguistic and cultural literacy.”

Initially, the materials will be geared towards flagship language students at UMD and at other institutions. Because these materials will be hosted on an open-source platform, they will ultimately be available for any student in the United States and beyond. 

“Developing cultural knowledge is an essential part of preparing students to be sophisticated global professionals,” said Valerie Anishchenkova, principal investigator and associate professor of Arabic studies. “This initiative will develop materials to help students be successful in not only the classroom and study abroad, but also in complex, multicultural professional environments.” 

Anishchenkova, an expert in Arabic studies, is currently exploring the relationships between identity, ideology and new media. Her research is directly relevant to concerns of the project. 

“Our goal is to develop a curriculum that will help students identify and analyze cultural assumptions,” she said. “The ability to recognize personal bias is an important skill for all of us, regardless of field or profession, and needs to be addressed separately from learning a language or studying the history of a culture.”

UMD is the sole institution to receive this award, which was open to all 21 universities with domestic undergraduate flagship programs. The FCI is an interdisciplinary collaboration involving institutional partners and experts in Arabic, Russian and Chinese studies. These partners include the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, University of Hawaii, Portland State University, the American Councils for International Education and overseas flagship centers in Morocco, Kazakhstan, Beijing and Nanjing.

 

### 

About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

UMD Researchers Develop Breakthrough Technique to Combat Cancer Drug Resistance

February 8, 2018
Contacts: 

Alyssa Wolice, (301) 405-3936

 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs – known as multidrug resistance – remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to “turn off” their resistance capabilities.

New findings put forth by University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering professor Xiaoming “Shawn” He and researchers from five other academic institutions point to a technique that uses specially designed nanoparticles and near infrared laser treatment to cause cancer cells to lose their multidrug resistance capabilities for days at a time. This creates a therapeutic window for chemotherapy to combat even the most drug-resistant cells left behind after surgery or earlier treatment. The group’s findings were published today in Nature Communications.

“By administering chemotherapy within this ‘therapeutic window,’ oncologists could apply a lower dose of chemotherapy drugs to patients, with the potential for an improved treatment outcome – all while minimizing drug toxicity to healthy organs,” He said.

One of the primary reasons cancer cells develop resistance is the overexpression of what are known as efflux pumps – proteins that protect a cell by pumping out unwanted toxic substances before they can reach their intended target. In the same way that efflux pumps work hard to protect against toxins, they also expel virtually all clinically relevant chemotherapy drugs.

Fortunately, efflux pumps require a source of chemical energy to perform their function. As such, by cutting off the energy supply to the efflux pumps, oncologists could lower – or even eliminate – a cell’s resistance to drugs, such as those administered for chemotherapy. Recognizing this, He and his research team developed a way to reduce the amount of chemical energy – adenosine triphosphate (ATP) – available to the efflux pumps in cancer cells.

The team – which also included researchers from The Ohio State University, University of Virginia, University of Missouri School of Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Indiana University School of Medicine – targeted a specially designed nanoparticle to the mitochondrion, the cell's power generator wherein the cell converts oxygen and nutrients into ATP. Once the nanoparticles reach the cancer cells’ mitochondria, the researchers apply near infrared laser treatment to trigger a chemical reaction that reduces the amount of ATP available to the pumps and, thus, cuts off their power supply. Such treatment both reduces the expression of the efflux pumps and decreases their distribution on the cell plasma membrane.

The research team’s findings demonstrate that the drug-laden nanoparticles – in combination with near infrared laser treatment – can effectively inhibit the growth of multidrug-resistant tumors with no evident systemic toxicity.

While researchers have long worked with nanoparticles for drug delivery, the findings put forth by He and his team represent a crucial breakthrough in addressing multidrug resistance in cancer cells.

“For years, researchers have focused on delivering more chemotherapy drugs into cancer cells using nanoparticles, without targeting the root of drug resistance,” He said. “This meant that the cancer cells maintained their ability to expel the chemotherapy drugs, which limited any enhancement of the cancer therapy. To address this challenge, our research group is using nanoparticles not only to deliver more chemotherapy drugs to the target site within cancer cells, but also to compromise the function of the efflux pumps and thereby significantly improve safety and efficacy of cancer therapy.”

Authors for the paper are:  Xiaoming “Shawn” He, University of Maryland (UMD) & The Ohio State University (OSU); Hai Wang, OSU, Zan Gao, University of Virginia (UVA); Xuanyou Liu, University of Missouri (MU), Pranay Agarwal, OSU; Shuting Zhao; OSU; Daniel W. Conroy, OSU; Guang Ji, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine (SHUTCM); Jianhua Yu, OSU; Christopher P. Jaroniec, SHUTCM; Zhenguo Liu, MU; Xiongbin Lu, Indiana University (IU); and Xiaodong Li, UVA.

This work was partially supported by grants from the American Cancer Society, the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

 

### 

About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

Pages

May 21
Researchers hope findings lead to increased use of and improved fit for hearing aids. Read
May 17
UMD study explores disagreement translating to success in complex projects or crisis situations. Read
May 14
Fearless Ideas: The Campaign for Maryland will support the university’s future with investments in students and... Read