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UMD Emerges as State Leader in 2018 RecycleMania Competition

May 2, 2018
Contacts: 

Andrew Muir, 301-405-4621

Richie Recyclemania SignGreen Terps sign upTestudo next to Recycling bin

 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- The annual RecycleMania competition among colleges and universities nationwide has concluded, and this year, the University of Maryland surpassed its 2017 results in almost every major category.

Highlights from the 2018 competition include:

  • No. 1 in the state of Maryland with a 49% recycling rate (an improvement from 44% in 2017);
  • No. 1 in the state of Maryland and No. 13 nationwide for the Total Recycling category, generating 922,603 pounds of recycling (an improvement from 808,676 pounds in 2017);
  • The university recycled 9,468 pounds of sensitive documents for shredding and 5,462 pounds of electronics during an all-campus shredding and electronics recycling event in March. 

The 2018 tournament featured 300 schools participating from 46 states in the United States, the Districtof Columbia and Canada, with an enrollment of 3.6 million students. Participating colleges and universities are ranked in various categories according to how much recycling and food waste they divert from the landfill over two months.

Throughout the competition, the university saved 861 metric tons of CO2 over an eight-week period, comparable to keeping over 169 cars off the road or the energy consumption of 75 households during this period of time.

“Once again, the University of Maryland posted great results for RecycleMania,” said Bill Guididas, Assistant Director, Administrative Services, Facilities Management. “One of the notable outcomes this year was the fact that while the percentage of waste recycled went up, the total volume of waste generated went down.  The focus on avoiding single use plastics and using reusable items has had a positive impact on the waste that we generate. “

Outreach and education efforts included a sensitive document shredding and e-waste event, educational activities at residence halls as a part of the Green Terp and Green Chapter programs, and the fifth annual “Recycle This!” video contest. This year’s winner was student, Nisha Seebachan ’19, for her video, “Why Recycling is Not a Trend; It’s Actually Important.” 

“RecycleMania provides us with an opportunity to engage with colleges around the importance of recycling and to encourage them to make the act of recycling a part of their daily routine,” said Helen Lowman, president and CEO, Keep America Beautiful. “Our goal with programs like RecycleMania is that these recycling behaviors stick with the participants throughout their lives and in turn, they educate their family and friends about the value of recycling and composting.”

For a sumary of UMD’s RecycleMania performance visit http://recyclemania.umd.edu 

 

UMD Leads Study on Improving HPV Vaccination Rates Among African-American Adolescents

April 30, 2018
Contacts: 

K. Lorraine Graham, 301-405-2782

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The University of Maryland (UMD) has received a $2.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop effective communication strategies to improve human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates among African-American adolescents. 

HPV is the most commonly sexually transmitted infection in the United States. If left untreated, it can cause a variety of cancers, but it is easily prevented through a vaccination. The best time to be vaccinated is between ages 11 and 12, which means that the decision to vaccinate or not is made by parents or caregivers. 

“This vaccine is especially controversial because parents, regardless of race, fear it will encourage their children to become sexually active sooner—even though there is no evidence to support that concern,” said Xiaoli Nan, professor of communication in UMD’s College of Arts and Humanities and director of UMD’s Center for Health and Risk Communication.

Nan will lead a cross-disciplinary research team that includes co-investigators Cheryl Holt and Min Qi Wang from UMD’s School of Public Health and Shana Ntiri and Clement Adebamowo from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). The team will develop and test communication strategies to encourage African-American parents to allow their children to receive the HPV vaccine. The study builds on research she began in 2011, which found that African-Americans’ historical mistrust of the medical community as well as negative views on vaccines partially contribute to the low vaccination rates.

"By bringing together an innovative team of investigators working across disciplinary boundaries and campuses, this ambitious project supports the goals of our strategic partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore,'" said Bonnie Thornton Dill, dean of the College of Arts and Humanities at UMD. "When communication scholars, public health experts and doctors from Maryland's most powerful public research institutions collaborate we can solve important health problems facing the state and the nation."

The research team will partner with several pediatric clinics in Baltimore to develop and test communication strategies to motivate the parents of African-American adolescents to allow their children to be vaccinated. Through focus groups and interviews, the team will learn more about the children who visit the clinics and their parents. This knowledge will help the researchers determine the best way to talk to individuals about the HPV vaccination. 

After creating and thoroughly testing several messages, they will determine which one is the most persuasive and how best to deliver it. Is it more persuasive for people to read a brochure on their own or to have a conversation with their pediatrician? Are parents more motivated by messages that talk about the positive benefits of getting the vaccine or the negative consequences of not getting it? These are the kinds of questions that the team will test and study.

"We are excited to expand our collaborative research with the University of Maryland through this project that is at the intersections of the humanities, public health and medicine,” said E. Albert Reece, executive vice president for medical affairs at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers distinguished professor and dean of UMSOM. 

By using research methods that draw on the humanities, social sciences and medicine, the team will ultimately make evidence-based recommendations for doctors, nurses and public health officials about how to communicate with African-American parents about the HPV vaccine. 

Nan believes that understanding how we communicate with each other and what motivates us to take action is a key element of understanding human nature, and that knowledge can be harnessed to promote positive social change.

“Nearly 50 percent of cancer cases can be prevented through lifestyle changes,” says Nan. “Communication science is an interdisciplinary research practice that can promote positive changes in health behaviors and save lives.” 

Nan is an expert in health and risk communication, studying how communication strategies influence health-related decisions. Research shows that African-Americans are more likely to develop--and die from-- cancer than others, partly because they are less likely to have access to adequate care and often face racism when they do receive care. Her research focuses on cancer prevention in medically underserved communities where people do not have access to adequate healthcare because of social and economic inequalities. 

 

 

 

UMD Partners with Korea Electronics Technology Institute to Advance New Energy Technologies

April 30, 2018
Contacts: 

Melissa L. Andreychek, 301-405-0292

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The University of Maryland and the Korea Electronics Technology Institute (KETI) located in Seongnam, Republic of Korea, have announced a five-year partnership to accelerate research and innovation of energy technologies.

UMD, led by the Maryland Energy Innovation Institute (MEI2) at the A. James Clark School of Engineering, and KETI will cooperate and develop innovative joint projects in fields of common interest,including: new types of batteries and other energy storage and conversion technologies; innovative power plant cooling; energy efficiency and building heating/cooling technologies; advanced energy materials; and intelligent transportation systems.

“The University of Maryland is already a demonstrated leader in sustainable energy research and technology transfer. This new partnership with the Korea Electronics Technology Institute will expand our capabilities to share knowledge, accelerate research discoveries, and create new technologies that advance our state, national, and international progress toward a more sustainable future,” said University of Maryland Provost Mary Ann Rankin.

“The stars align in this collaboration,” said University of Maryland President Wallace D. Loh. “It brings investment to Maryland, combines together two world leaders in energy research and innovation, and will help advance sustainability.”

KETI members with UMD members

From left to right: Chungwon Park, President of KETI; Ungyu Paik, Minister of Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy; Eric Wachsman, director of MEI2; Mary Ann Rankin, Provost of UMD; and Wallace D. Loh, President of UMD.

Last year, Maryland Governor Larry Hogan authorized $7.5 million in state funding for MEI2, a UMD-based initiative that is designed to catalyze clean energy research programs at academic institutions in the state and attract and develop private investment in clean energy innovation and commercialization. UMD officials say the partnership provides a unique capability to move toward this goal through the exchange of UMD and KETI faculty, students, and other scholars for research, teaching, and study; joint research activities; and the exchange of scholarly publications and other information, including library collections and services.

“The Maryland Energy Innovation Institute was created to advance energy innovation by translating university research to companies and jobs for the State of Maryland. This collaboration with the Korea Electronics Technology Institute will provide additional resources to accomplish this mission, initially with respect to research but ultimately toward commercialization of the developed technologies,” said Eric Wachsman, director of MEI2 and William L. Crentz Centennial Chair in Energy Research at UMD.

“Moreover, we are particularly excited by the support of the Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy as we create a stronger partnership between Maryland based and Korean energy industries,” added Wachsman.

On April 21, representatives from UMD, KETI, and the Korean Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Energy gathered in Potomac, Maryland, to sign a memorandum of understanding to officially launch the partnership.

 

 

 

UMD Awards Funds to Support Campus Sustainability Projects

April 27, 2018
Contacts: 

Andrew Muir, 301-405-7068

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- The University of Maryland’s Office of Sustainability recently announced University Sustainability Fund projects approved for 2018. The fund provides grants to students, faculty, and staff for the implementation of projects that will improve sustainability on campus or in the local community.

Projects approved for funding by the Student Sustainability Fund Review Committee and the University Sustainability Council include: 

  • Green Terp and Green Chapter: $121,728
  • Student Leadership in Campus Community Expanded: $50,000
  • Next Generation Technologies for Sensing, Actuation and Control of reACT: $47,500
  • Aquaponics Research Center: $36,800
  • Environmental Justice Symposium: $17,000
  • Stamp Vertical Garden: $15,000
  • Understanding and Navigating Environmental Justice: $14,000
  • Gemstone Team Sunny D/Purify: $6,372
  • Gemstone Team CAPTURE: $4,070
  • Gemstone Team OMEGA: $2,500
  • Gemstone Team Oysters: $1,616

“The University Sustainability Fund has proven to be a critical campus resource that supports new and innovative sustainability projects across the university,” said Scott Lupin, Director, Office of Sustainability. “Programs like Green Terp and Green Chapter are so important because they are designed to inform, educate and engage students about sustainability and their personal behaviors.”

Sudent Signs up for Green Terps Program

Leading the awards, the Green Terp and Green Chapter programs received additional funding this year after a successful pilot phase completed in 2017. Green Terp started as a pilot in Oakland and Ellicott Hall focused on encouraging sustainable behaviors and has now expanded to thirteen residence halls. The next step is to expand to become a campus-wide program. 

"Green Terp is growing into a highly successful program for sustainability education in our residence halls,” said Deb Grander, Director, Department of Resident Life. “We are excited to have received this grant to help us expand the program throughout our residential communities. Green Terp is a significant step in transforming students' behaviors around living a sustainable life.  We are proud that our students have taken such a strong interest in this program as they become global citizens for sustainability now and in the future.”    

Student poses after signing up for Green Terps program

The partner program to Green Terp entitled Green Chapter focuses on encouraging sustainable behaviors in the Greek Life community. The program currently features eight fraternity and sorority chapters. 

"It was exciting for us to double the size of the program from last year and include one of our non-housed groups, Lambda Theta Alpha, a member of the Multicultural Greek Council,” said Heidi Biffl, Senior Coordinator, Department of Fraternity & Sorority Life. “Our community responded to the program with great commitment and enthusiasm so with support from the Sustainability Fund, we are looking forward to expanding the program to more chapters next year."

The grant for the UMD Solar Decathlon house, reACT marks an important next step for the university to display its award-winning project on campus. The grant was secured by the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and the A. James Clark School of Engineering.    

Other projects approved for funding include the “Student Leadership in Campus Community Expanded,” grant from the College of Information Studies and the National Center for Smart Growth, which provides students the opportunity to work with local municipalities to address sustainability issues; The Stamp Student Union’s vertical garden to increase green features in the building; and grants for environmental justice efforts in the School of Public Health and ongoing student research projects in the Gemstone program. 

“Watching these projects come to fruition as a student member of the Sustainability Council has been incredibly satisfying,” said Logan Kline ‘18, Environmental Science and Policy student. “Each project proposal was vetted by a diverse collection of students who represent multiple colleges, backgrounds, and interests. This ensured that projects coming to the Council reflected student interests and sustainability values at their cores, and hopefully will encourage more student groups to propose their own projects in upcoming years.”

Since 2011, the University Sustainability Fund has granted $2.2 million to 120 sustainability projects. 

For more information: sustainabilityfund.umd.edu

University of Maryland Recognized as Best Value College in the State

April 27, 2018
Contacts: 

Jennifer Burroughs, 301-405-4621

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- The University of Maryland has been honored as one of the nation's best value colleges by Forbes. UMD’s value was ranked No. 1 in Maryland, in the top 15 among public colleges and top 50 overall. 

In an effort to help students and their families make the best education decisions for their financial situations and evaluate likely return on their investment, Forbes assessed each institution on quality of education, alumni earnings, student loan debt, net price, graduation rate and pell grant recipients. Large public research universities dominated the top of the list with the University of California, Los Angeles and University of California, Berkley at No. 1 and No. 2, respectively. 

UMD was also recognized for its value by Kiplinger’s Personal FInance and The Princeton Review this year. 

The full Forbes list of America’s Best Value Colleges is here: www.forbes.com/value-colleges/list/

Statement on Athletic Director Search -- April 26, 2018

April 26, 2018
Contacts: 

Jessica Jennings, 301-405-4621

In a message to the campus leadership today, President Wallace D. Loh said: 


Dear colleagues,

The University of Maryland is ​launching​ a national and confidential search for the new Athletic Director.

​A national search​ means that we ​seek and consider all ​qualified candidates. ​A confidential search​ means that​ we secure the privacy of all candidates. The only candidate who will be identified ​publicly is the one ​named​ as the new Athletic Director. ​

The search committee: 

  • ​Darryll Pines, committee chair; Dean of the A. J. Clark School of Engineering and Farvardin Professor of Aerospace Engineering
  • Mark Butler, ​UMD Foundation Board​ trustee​; ​Chairman and CEO, Ollie's Bargain Outlet Holdings, Harrisburg, PA
  • Michele Eastman, Assistant President and Chief of Staff
  • Barry Gossett, Vice Chair, USM Board of Regents​; chairman, New Acton Mobile Industries​
  • ​Nicholas Hadley, Faculty Athletic Representative​; ​Professor of Physics
  • Cheryl Harrison, Director of Development, ​Maryland ​Athletics
  • Missy Meharg, Head Coach, field hockey
  • Andrew Valmon, Head Coach, track and field

​After interviewing national search firms, we selected ​Turnkey Search. In recent years, Turnkey helped recruit new Athletic Directors for ​the ​University of Michigan, University of Minnesota, University of Nebraska, Georgia Tech, University of Alabama, University of Tennessee, Georgetown University, and Bowling Green State University.

The ​Turnkey ​consultants ​who will assist us in ​our ​search​ are:

  • Len Perna, Esq., Founder and CEO of ​Turnkey​​. He ​has ​overseen​ the successful completion of 500 executive-level searches in professional sports.
  • Gene DeFilippo, ​Managing Director of Turnkey. He served as Athletics Director at Boston College, Villanova, and University of South Carolina-Upstate​. He brings ​39 years of experience in intercollegiate athletic administration and higher education.

They have extensive relationships with athletics administrators ​from ​across the country. They will ensure a confidential and secure application process​, ​as well as arrange all candidate interviews. ​

The consultants will meet ​with members of various internal and external stakeholder​ groups​, including University shared governance bodies, athletics coaches and staff, student-athletes, academic and administrative leaders, and friends and supporters of Maryland Athletics.

​Their goal is to ​gather input​​ on the desired ​candidate profile for ​the next ​​UMD Athletic Director​. ​This​ information will​ ​help them ​develop ​the job description and identify and ​recruit ​the best-fit candidates for the position. All ​inquiries and communications regarding UMD's search will be managed by Turnkey. 

I anticipate​, as do ​the consultants, that the ​UMD ​Athletic ​Director position ​will attract strong candidates​ from throughout the nation.  

​Our University's membership in the ​select Association of American Universities​; our location near Washington, D.C. and Baltimore; our membership in the Big Ten Conference and Big Ten Academic Alliance; the excellence and dedication of our coaches and athletics staff; the storied ​history of​ Maryland Athletics; the new indoor practice facility and the planned clinical and research facilities for sports medicine, health, and human performance in ​the new ​Cole Field House; the new Barry and Mary Gossett Center for Academic and Personal Excellence of student-athletes; the upcoming ​University​-wide Fearless Ideas capital campaign, with high goals for Maryland Athletics -- these are​ the kinds ​of the opportunities that will attract candidates with ​the ethical values, the commitment to student-athletes' welfare,​ the administrative experience, ​the leadership​ and interpersonal skills, ​and the ​​energy, ​vision, and passion to lead our athletics program to new levels of success and impact. 

​Maryland ​Athletics is the "front porch" of ​our University. ​As President, my responsibility is to appoint an Athletics Director ​who will be​ the best fit for the University of Maryland, informed by the input of all key stakeholders; then, be a strong partner of the Athletics Director in the years ahead to realize the highest expectations ​we all share ​for Maryland Athletics. 

Thank you for your​ support of Maryland Athletics. ​

 

Sincerely,

Wallace D. Loh

President, University of Maryland  

 

Finalists Announced in 2018 Do Good Challenge

April 25, 2018
Contacts: 

Kaitlin Ahmad, 301-405-6360 

COLLEGE PARK, Md.-- The University of Maryland’s School of Public Policy and its Do Good Institute recently announced six finalists for the 2018 Do Good Challenge. The annual challenge supports the university’s culture of philanthropy, innovation and entrepreneurship, spotlighting student groups that are making a social impact on campus, in the community, and globally. Selected from 113 teams that entered the competition, this year’s finalists includes groups that are addressing social issues that range from prenatal health to sustainability and recycling to mental health to Alzheimer’s detection. 

The 2018 Do Good Challenge finalists are:

Projects

  • Nourish: Mommy and Me partners with the Gabriel Network, a nonprofit organization that helps women and families challenged with a crisis pregnancy, to deliver weekly maternity meal boxes to expecting mothers in Maryland. Meal boxes include groceries, recipes, and educational materials that offer pregnancy tips, health facts, and more. Nourish team members include Sarah Dudley, School of Public Policy, Beyond the Classroom, and Samantha Kennedy, School of Public Health.

  • Scholars Promoting and Revitalizing Care (SPARC) seeks to address gaps in mental health resources at the University of Maryland by advocating for increased accessibility, funding, and staffing for campus mental health facilities. The team also works to raise awareness about existing resources on campus and encourages students to prioritize and dialogue about mental health. SPARC team members include Anthony Sartori, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences; Roxy Kazem, Robert H. Smith School of Business, Scholars Program, College Park Scholars (Public Leadership); Kirsten Brockett, Individual Studies Program; Sreya Gunna, Individual Studies Program, CIVICUS; Ferddy Gedeon, Individual Studies Program, College Park Scholars (Science Discovery and the University), and Alyssa Schledwitz, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, College Park Scholars (Life Sciences).

  • Terp Thon, the largest student-run philanthropic organization at the University of Maryland, raises funds and awareness for patients and their families at the Children’s National Health System. Throughout the year, the organization hosts various awareness campaigns, events and fundraising activities, including their annual dance marathon where students stand for 12 hours (a typical nurses’ shift) in support of current and former patients. All of the funds raised by the group provide patients and families with superior medical care and an array of support programs to enhance their hospital experience. Terp Thon team members include Amara Fox, School of Public Health, College Park Scholars (Global Public Health); Kate Burgess, School of Education; Elizabeth McKinley, School of Education; Brenna Hohl, James Clark School of Engineering, University Honors; and Kelly Stipa, Robert H. Smith School of Business and College of Arts and Humanities, University Honors.

Ventures

  • Recyclify is developing a phone application and smart bin to increase recycling rates at the University of Maryland. The group plans to educate and incentivize students through the app with a “Green Score” that provides redeemable points at several STAMP food court locations. The student group implemented bi-weekly recycling bin audits in the fall and spring semesters,  and is working to increase its vendor sponsorships. Recyclify received a mini-grant from the Office of Sustainability and will work closely with Dining Services and Facilities Management to develop their prototype. Recyclify team members include Ardalan Djourabtchi, Robert H. Smith School of Business; Christopher Langreo, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences; and Jason Malkofsky-Berger, Robert H. Smith School of Business.

  • Symbiont Health developed an enhanced medical alert system to accelerate the response and rescue of elderly persons who fall and lose consciousness. The device and alert system detects falls through motion sensors and gyroscopic technology. The student group is working to expand its services by implementing a mesh networking system for WiFi routers to better track patient behaviors in real-time, with vital diagnostic information. The group has a prototype and plans to test the router hardware in three homes—Sunrise, Brightview, and Manorcare—this summer. Symbiont Health team members include Erich Meissner, James Clark School of Engineering, Honors College (Entrepreneurship and Innovation); Kyle Liu, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, University Honors; and Maria Chen, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Honors College (Integrated Life Sciences).

  • Synapto is an early stage biotech company revolutionizing Alzheimer's diagnosis through portable electroencephalogram (EEG) and machine learning. The innovative device moves away from costly neuroimaging diagnostic techniques and qualitative methods of diagnosis to a more robust, affordable, and objective measure of analysis. They are currently seeking FDA approval (under the 510(k) Class 2 Medical Device Pathway) to continue their work. Synapto team members include Dhruv Patel, James Clark School of Engineering, College Park Scholars; Christopher Look, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, James Clark School of Engineering, Honors College (Entrepreneurship and Innovation); Anoop Patel, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, James Clark School of Engineering, Honors College (Design Cultures & Creativity); David Boegner, James Clark School of Engineering; and Megha Guggari, College of Computer, Mathematical and Natural Sciences, Honors College (Integrated Life Sciences).

On May 1, the finalists will pitch their projects or ventures to a panel of judges and an audience for a chance to win a share of more than $20,000. First place winners in each category will receive $5,000, while second place teams will each win $2,500, and third place winners will receive $1,000 each. Additionally, audience choice awards will be decided during the ceremony with prizes that range from $750 to $1,500. 

This years Do Good Challenge will be judged by Michelle Gilliard, partner, Venture Philanthropy Partners; Kahlil Kettering, Urban Conservation director, The Nature Conservancy, DC/MD Chapter; Linda Powers, founder, Miles for Smiles; Dana Priest, two-time Pulitzer prize winner, John S. and James L. Knight Chair in Public Affairs Journalism, University of Maryland; Ben Simon, CEO, Imperfect Produce; and Jed Woelfle, CFP, managing director, Morgan Stanley.

 

20th Annual Maryland Day: A One-Day Celebration of Learning and Discovery

April 25, 2018
Contacts: 

Natifia Mullings, 301-405-4076

COLLEGE PARK, Md.-- The University of Maryland will welcome thousands of visitors to its 20th annual Maryland Day on Saturday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A one-day celebration of learning and discovery, Maryland Day features hundreds of free, family-friendly exhibitions, performances, and demonstrations that showcase how UMD students and faculty are transforming the community, the state and the world. 

Events and activities will span the entire campus, across six learning neighborhoods: Terp Town Center, Ag Day Avenue, Arts and Design Place, Biz and Society Hill, Sports and Rec Row, and Science and Tech Way. For the 20th celebration, the University of Maryland has compiled a “Top 20 at 20” list which features some of the most popular Maryland Day events, as well as new events this year. These events include: 

  • African-American History Tour-- Take part in a walking tour led by experts to uncover UMD’s history of the perseverance, sacrifices and dedication of African Americans in making the university inclusive and accessible to all.
  • Bucket Drumming Lessons-- Explore the African rhythms of Gahu with the School of Music and the Clarice and develop unique beats using only buckets and drumsticks.
  • Escape Room--  Designed and built by students, the UMD Escape Room is a fun and exciting puzzle challenge. Test your wits to escape the room before the time runs out.
  • Life in the Anchor Chair-- Ever wonder what it’s like to deliver the nightly news? Participate in an interactive experience in the anchor’s chair in the Eaton Broadcast Center.
  • Life-Size Home Fire Simulation-- The Department of Fire Protection Engineering will set fire to two life-size residential rooms on the Mitchell Fields: one with sprinklers, the other without. Witness the dramatic life safety and property protection provided by sprinkler systems.
  • Men’s and Women’s Basketball Autographs-- Join team members on McKeldin Mall’s Main Stage for a photo and autograph session. One photo and autograph per person; the line is limited to the first 500 people.
  • Fun with Robots-- The Autonomous Unmanned Systems Stream and Department of Aerospace Engineering invite guests to the front of the Manufacturing Building to interact with groups of small robots built by students.
  • Inspect Petting Zoo-- Learn about tarantulas, exotic insects, scorpions, bees, millipedes, and more. 

For the full top 20 events at Maryland Day, visit www.marylandday.umd.edu

In addition, Maryland Day will include a fashion show that spotlights the latest in Terp trends and a volunteer opportunity to package meals with Terps Against Hunger. Visitors can also collect new limited-edition commemorative pins at the event. Each neighborhood will feature a unique themed pin. For pin locations, visit www.marylandday.umd.edu

Maryland Day will take place rain or shine. Parking and admission are free. To learn more about Maryland Day or to use the Maryland Day planning tool, visit www.marylandday.umd.edu

 

 

UMD Student Team Wins HUD Affordable Housing Competition

April 23, 2018
Contacts: 

Maggie Haslam, 202-258-8946

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - An interdisciplinary team of University of Maryland real estate, planning, business and architecture graduate students took first place in the fifth annual HUD Innovation in Affordable Housing Student Design and Planning (IAH) Competition 2018. The UMD team initially beat out over 40 teams from graduate-level programs across the U.S. for a finalist slot for their project named “Beacon Crossing,” a mixed-income, multi-age affordable housing project that doubles as a community asset. 

“There is still a great need for quality affordable housing throughout the country,” said UMD real estate graduate student Daniel Green. “Beacon Crossing utilizes best practices from across the industry in terms of financing, social services, design and sustainability. Applying these innovative techniques can serve as a model for creating quality housing across the country.”

Team Maryland HUD winnersThe UMD team includes: Sacheen Scott (M.C.P.), Nathan Robbins (MRED, M.B.A.), Lauren Gilmartin (M.ARCH, M.C.P.), Daniel Green (MRED) and Adan Ramos (M.ARCH, MRED). Maria Day-Marshall, Director of the Real Estate Development Program at UMD and Rob McClennan, AIA, from Bonstra | Haresign Architects are the team’s advisors. 

The IAH competition is based on the philosophy that ideas and innovations from the next generation of professionals are essential to fulfilling the need for affordable, sustainable housing. The competition challenges interdisciplinary, graduate-level teams to address the social, economic and environmental issues that surround a real-world housing problem in the United States, by creating innovative and original solutions through development, design and finance. 

This year’s competition asked teams to design a 154-unit housing complex, in Dover, N.H., that caters to senior citizens and adults with disabilities. The site challenges include increasing the density of the site and balancing the number of dwellings with communal supports, such as common areas, office space, security and a high level of accessibility. Beacon Crossing’s universal design placed attractive community amenities—which include a YMCA, grand plaza and community center—within the heart of the complex, a boon not just to residents but to the surrounding community, a deliberate move to draw people from the outside in. 

“I think what set our design apart was that we took the time to understand the needs of the residents and the greater community,” said Green. “By locating such strong community amenities on site, we hope to eliminate the stigma of affordable housing and foster interactions and relationships across socio-economic lines.” 

Creating connection was also the goal behind the innovative social programming planned for the site, geared specifically to its multi-generational, multi-ability population. A signature social service program, Beacon Buddies and Care, is a peer-to-peer support program that provides meals, housekeeping and wellness checks for community members with the most needs. Unlike typical congregate housing programs that rely on hard-to-attain federal funding, the program would be financed through a mix of voluntary monthly fees from residents, operating revenue and a social services reserve account, allowing the program to begin serving residents more quickly. 

Creative financing also won the day by solving a critical project financing gap, a result of the small pool of low income housing tax credits (LIHTC) available in New Hampshire. By proposing a paired LIHTC structure, the project could take advantage of both low-income housing credits and non-competitive credits simultaneously. 

"The team did an absolutely phenomenal job,” said Day-Marshall. “Not only did they present an innovative, comprehensive project, they delivered an exceptionally professional presentation. The fact that they knew the project inside and out allowed them to really engage the jury, which I think set them apart in the competition."

This is the first time the University of Maryland has won the HUD Innovation in Affordable Housing Student Design and Planning (IAH) Competition and the second time it has placed in the finals. A team of students took second place and a $10,000 prize in 2016. This year’s winning team won $20,000. 

It felt great to have our hard work recognized,” said Real Estate and Business student Nathan Robbins. “It’s a nice final chapter for me at Maryland as I approach graduation this May.”

Learn more about the IAH competition here. 

 

UMD Announces Inventions of the Year Winners and Celebrates Ventures, and Partnerships

April 20, 2018
Contacts: 

Lee Tune, 301-405-4679

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Innovations with the potential for better, cheaper electric vehicle charging,  life-changing impact in health outcomes and more reliable facial detection software have been named the University of Maryland 2017 Inventions of the Year winners.

Although electric vehicles are becoming increasingly popular, they have yet to reach widespread adoption as manufacturers aim to reduce costs. One reason electric vehicles are expensive is because they have two batteries which require two different charging systems. UMD researchers have invented a new interface for electric vehicle charging that condenses previous charging mechanisms into one system. The interface is over 50 percent cheaper and lighter, almost 40 percent smaller, and 8 percent more efficient. Their Integrated Power Electronics Interface for Enhanced Electric Vehicle Charging was named the Overall Invention of the Year Winner and the winner in the Physical Sciences category.

The inventors are: Alireza Khaligh, associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Institute for Systems Research at the A. James Clark School of Engineering; Jiangheng Lu, graduate student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the A. James Clark School of Engineering; and Ayan Mallik, graduate student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the A. James Clark School of Engineering

A Flexible Urinary Catheter Insert to Detect and Prevent Bacterial Infections was the winner in the Life Sciences category.  Urinary tract infections are the most commonly reported health-care associated infection, and over 75 percent of reported cases involve the use of a catheter. Catheter-associated UTIs develop when bacterial biofilms form on the surface of an indwelling catheter. UMD researchers have invented a catheter insert which can detect and prevent the formation of biofilms and can treat the infection when combined with an antibiotic.

The inventors are: Ryan Huiszoon, Ph.D. student in the Fischell Department of Bioengineering at the James A. Clark School of Engineering; Pradeep Rajasekaran, post-doctoral researcher with the Institute for Systems Research (ISR); and Reza Ghodssi, Herbert Rabin Distinguished Chair in Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the A. James Clark School of Engineering and ISR

The winner in the Information Sciences category was a Robust System for Large Scale Facial Verification and Search.  Facial recognition software has steadily gained popularity over the past decade, but its unreliability and tendency to produce false-positives make it problematic for widespread adoption. However, UMD researchers have recognized the potential for face-detection software adoption in many industries and have invented a new software which uses deep convolutional neural networks to analyze images, producing vastly better results than previous software.

The inventors are: Rajeev Ranjan, graduate student with the UMD Institute for Advanced Computer Studies (UMIACS) at the College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences;

Carlos Castillo, assistant research scientist at UMIACS; and Ramalingam Chellappa, Distinguished University Professor and Minta Martin Professor of Engineering and chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the A. James Clark School of Engineering.

Since 1987, UMD has honored exceptional inventions that have the potential to make an important impact on science, society, and the free market. The Invention of the Year award finalists are selected from prior year invention disclosures in three categories: Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, and Information Sciences. A panel of judges selected one invention from each category to win the 2017 Invention of the Year Award. Julie Lenzer, associate vice president for innovation and economic development and co-director of UM Ventures, presented the awards.

Innovate Maryland

The Inventions of the Year  were announced on April 11 at Innovate Maryland, an annual event hosted this year at The Hotel at the University of Maryland. More than 400 faculty, students, staff, and campus partners gathered to celebrate groundbreaking research, innovations, entrepreneurship, and partnerships connected to the University of Maryland. More than a dozen startup companies borne from UMD research were featured in a showcase, with products ranging from a smart wood stove and a living green patio umbrella to an electronic home plate and mobile personal air conditioner. Prior to the awards program, the UMD Office of Technology Commercialization hosted a CEO Mixer to help connect faculty entrepreneurs with serial entrepreneurs in search of their next venture opportunity.

Several other recognitions were made at the event, including:

  • The Advanced Cybersecurity Experience for Students (ACES) honors program was noted as the UMD Corporate Connector of the Year. The award is given each year to an individual or a program in the university that has established partnerships with the private sector in corporate research, philanthropy, and/or student support.\
  • MF Fire Inc., a Baltimore-based startup company selling CatalystTM, a smart, clean, modern wood burning stove based on technology developed at UMD was given the Maryland Technology Enterprise Institute (Mtech) Venture of the Year award, which recognizes excellence in innovation by leveraging University of Maryland-originated new knowledge or technology to solve real world problems.

 

 

 

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