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UMD Team Again Wins National Affordable Housing Design Competition

April 22, 2019
Contacts: 

Maria Day-Marshall  301-405-6795, Lee Tune 301-405-4679

 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – For the second year in a row, a team of graduate students from the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation has won the Innovation in Affordable Housing Student Design and Planning Competition sponsored by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). UMD teams finished first last year and second in 2016, their only two previous entries in the 6-year-old competition.

This year the University of Maryland team took first place and the $20,000 top prize with its design for Brooklyn Bend, a mixed-use housing and retail development for low- and moderate-income residents located along San Antonio’s Riverwalk. Results were announced Wednesday. Defending champion Maryland beat out more than 70 other teams, including the other three finalists, second place University of California, Berkeley, and runners-up Yale University and Virginia Tech.

Judges cited the team’s well-developed financial package and understanding of the concepts behind the proposal, and commended the project for having the highest population density among the four finalists. The design, which fronts the San Antonio River, emphasizes energy efficiency, water pollution control and promotion of healthy lifestyles.

Instead of a layout that included just one or two large buildings, the team designed a village-like development with a variety of housing unit designs and sizes to meet a wide range of needs, said Kyle Huck (dual master’s degree program in architecture and real estate development).

“All the proposals were unique in their own ways, but I think what set ours apart was that we really tried to use the site to its highest and best use,” he said, “and not just meet the requirements but to use the site as appropriately as possible to create a proposal that was more dense, which results in a greater amount of affordable housing.”

“We have a lot of dual degrees on our team,” said Cassandra Huntington (dual master’s degree program in architecture and real estate development). “The fact that we have the real estate development degree in addition to the architecture degree gives us a leg up on most of the competition, because we have a better understanding of both the design and the finance sides.”

In addition to graduate students Huck and Huntington, other members of the team are:  Lauren Stamm (master’s degree program in community planning); Andrew Mazer (master’s degree program in architecture); and Nyasha Mandima (master’s degree program in real estate development). The team’s advisors are Maria Day-Marshall, director of UMD’s Real Estate Development Program. and Rob McClennan, senior project manager, Bonstra | Haresign Architects, AIA, and UMD adjunct professor.

Donald Linebaugh, interim dean of the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, said the Maryland team's design demonstrated the strengths of the school's interdisciplinary approach.

"Their winning submission was a thoughtful and nuanced response to a challenging site along San Antonio's Riverwalk," said Donald Linebaugh, interim dean of the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation. "They drew on their strengths in design, planning, and real estate finance to craft a project that put people and community first, activating the site and delivering a safe, affordable, and beautiful housing solution."

"With 12 dual degree programs in our School," explained Linebaugh, "MAPP+D is a national leader in interdisciplinary graduate education. And the students' innovative winning submission, clearly demonstrates the strengths of our interdisciplinary approach to the built environment."  

The San Antonio Housing Authority board, which is looking to redevelop the site, will review the winning proposal in coming months.

According to HUD, “the need for quality, affordable housing has never been greater,” and its affordable housing competition is intended to “advance the design and production of livable and sustainable housing for low- and moderate-income people through research and innovation.”

 

“When it comes to creating innovative affordable housing, HUD does not do this work alone,” HUD Secretary Ben Carson said in a statement. “Congratulations to the University of Maryland and all of our finalists, for their consciousness stream of good ideas that increases housing opportunity for Americans with modest incomes.”

University of Maryland Statement Against Hate and Bias

November 5, 2017
Contacts: 

 Katie Lawson, 301-405-4622

 
Statement Against Hate and Bias 
Joel Seligman, AVP for Communications and Marketing - November 5, 2017
 

UMD sincerely regrets the overwhelming misunderstanding resulting in the #UMDNotAHome social media conversation. The statements on social media connected to this hashtag do not reflect the positions of the university or our leaders' mutual commitment to diversity and inclusion on campus and across our nation.

To put it plainly, the UMD administration stands against hate and bias in all of its forms and wants every Terp to feel welcome, safe and at home at the University of Maryland. 

In recent months, there have been instances of intentional provocation by hateful, far-right groups spreading targeted messages that the administration finds despicable. These outside agitators want to divide our campus community into factions that are in conflict with one another from within UMD, rather than see our campus stand together in opposition to the broader forces of hate, white supremacy, anti-immigrant xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia and anti-semitism. 

It is understandable that some members of our community are also disturbed by remarks by university officials, even when the comments are quoted entirely out of context and in a manner that misrepresents the meaning. UMD has seen an example of one of our longtime colleagues unfairly criticized for her efforts to provide legal advice to the University Senate Campus Affairs Committee literally at the same time she is working to advance the cause of inclusion.

The administration encourages all members of our community to work together—students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni—to increase respect, inclusiveness, and cohesiveness on our campus. A comprehensive list of efforts underway by UMD administration is available at umd.edu/umdreflects 

 

 

UMD Named a 2017 Best College by MONEY Magazine

July 12, 2017
Contacts: 

Jennifer Burroughs, 301-405-4621

COLLEGE PARK, Md.  The University of Maryland ranked No. 11 among public universities according to MONEY Magazine’s 2017 list of Best Colleges. UMD ranked No. 20 overall among U.S. institutions. 

To calculate rankings, MONEY assessed more than 700 colleges in the U.S. based on three equally-weighted categories, including educational quality, affordability and alumni success. MONEY measured 27 factors within these categories covering areas such as instructor quality, measuring the study-to-faculty ratio, affordability for low-income students and value-added earnings, which measures if the school is launching students to better paying jobs. 

Earlier this year, UMD was also ranked a Best Value College by ForbesPrinceton Review and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

UMD Capitol Hill Forum Addresses Health Disparities Research & Action for Equity

September 23, 2016
Contacts: 

Contacts: Elise Carbonaro, 301-405-6501

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland, in collaboration with Rep. John P. Sarbanes and the Big Ten Academic Alliance, recently convened more than 100 people for a Research on the Hill forum focused on strategies to achieve health equity at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C. Moderated by Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D., professor and director of the Maryland Center for Health Equity in the UMD School of Public Health, the panel discussion engaged experts from academia, federal health agencies and the private business sector in a candid conversation about how to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities among vulnerable populations.

“Our exploratory research holds the solutions to many of the most challenging problems of our day,” said UMD Vice President and Chief Research Officer Patrick G. O’Shea, Ph.D. “As a university, it is our mission to create and understand knowledge to develop better ways to house and heal and fuel and feed our people in advanced societies that are just, secure, and free. Achieving health equity touches on the ‘heal’ aspect of that mission.”

The topics ranged from the progress that has been made in access to medical care as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to challenges that still remain in improving quality of care and in making the medical care system incorporate public health and address the social determinants of health that prevent people from acting health promotion and disease prevention recommendations. 

“The state of Maryland has embraced the ACA and there is clear evidence that the new incentives are indeed moving hospital systems away from a fee-for-service business model to one that rewards quality care and positive health outcomes over the volume of procedures,” said Thomas. “While the transition is not perfect, our state is a national leader for what the future of health care will look like.”

Panel members shared examples of effective and innovative community-based health interventions and public-private partnerships that are making a difference through culturally-tailored health promotion and disease prevention services, and highlighted the emergence of social determinants of health such as poverty, discrimination and residential segregation as factors that must be overcome.

 “I’m convinced that if you address racial and ethnic disparities with respect to the delivery of health care and health care coverage in this country, you will build the best health care system we can possibly have because diversity is our country’s hallmark,” said Congressman Sarbanes, who, as a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has been a tireless advocate for improving healthcare quality and addressing health disparities.
 
To achieve health equity, researchers, policymakers, and industry leaders must address broader issues beyond the traditional biomedical model and build trust between those who control health care delivery system and those who have lost hope in the system, said members of the panel. 

The panelists recommended that health equity be incorporated into all public policies, not just those related to health care, to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities. 

Panel members included:

  • Margo Edmunds, Ph.D., Vice President, Evidence Generation and Translation at Academy Health;
  • J. Nadine Gracia, M.D., M.S.C.E., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director of the Office of Minority Health within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;
  • Julia Huggins, President of Cigna Mid-Atlantic;
  • Kolawole Okuyemi, M.D., MPH, Professor of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Director of the Program in Health Disparities Research and Inaugural Endowed Chair for Health Equity at the University of Minnesota; and
  • Eliseo Pérez-Stable, M.D., Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health.

House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer, who represents Maryland’s 5th Congressional District and is a distinguished UMD alumnus, also joined the event and emphasized that as an interconnected community, we should all care about health disparities.
 
“It is unacceptable that in the United States, where all are created equal in the words of our Declaration of Independence, that one’s access to healthcare may be higher or lower as a result of race, gender, or income,” said Congressman Hoyer. “Everybody being healthy is of concern to each and every one of us.”
 
He discussed how we must continue to defend the patient protections that Americans are benefiting from thanks to the ACA, such as the no-cost access to preventive services like mammograms and immunizations, as well as remind people of the dramatic increase in the number of people, particularly people of color, who now have health coverage as a result.

The event was held as part of the University of Maryland’s Research on the Hill series, which is aimed at raising awareness of research with great societal significance.

View the conversation at: https://youtu.be/HPedKr0jZLQ

UMD Study Finds Connecting Uninsured Patients to Primary Care Could Reduce ER Use

May 6, 2015
Contacts: 

Kelly Blake 301-405-9418
Hillery Tsumba 301-628-3425

Montgomery County, Md. Initiative Could Improve Health, Reduce Costs

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – An intervention to connect low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to a reliable source of primary health care shows promise for reducing avoidable use of hospital emergency departments in Maryland. A University of Maryland School of Public Health study evaluating the results of the intervention was published this week in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs

For twenty years, use of hospital emergency departments has been on the rise in the United States, particularly among low-income patients who face barriers to accessing health care outside of hospitals, including not having an identifiable primary health care provider. Almost half of emergency room visits are considered “avoidable.” The Emergency Department-Primary Care Connect Initiative of the Primary Care Coalition, which ran from 2009 through 2011, linked low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to safety-net health clinics. 

“Our study found that uninsured patients with chronic health issues – such as those suffering from hypertension, diabetes, asthma, COPD, congestive heart failure, depression or anxiety – relied less on the emergency department after they were linked to a local health clinic for ongoing care,” says Dr. Karoline Mortensen, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and senior researcher. “Connecting patients to primary care and expanding the availability of these safety-net clinics could reduce emergency department visits and provide better continuity of care for vulnerable populations.”  

Funded by a grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the initiative engaged all five of the hospitals operating in Montgomery County, Maryland at the time, and four safety-net clinics serving low-income patients. Using “patient navigators,” individuals trained to help patients find the care they need and can afford, these hospitals referred more than 10,000 low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients who visited emergency departments to four local primary care clinics, with the goal of encouraging them to establish an ongoing relationship with the clinic and reduce their reliance on costly emergency department care. 

Two hospitals in Montgomery County who participated in the intervention continued the program after the initial grant period concluded because of the benefits they saw for patients and for reducing emergency department visits and associated costs. These hospitals are currently testing a new version of the intervention specifically deigned to link emergency department patients with behavioral health conditions to appropriate community-based services. 

While hospital administrators and health policy experts throughout the country are recognizing that access to primary care improves continuity of care for patients and reduces avoidable use of emergency departments, the implications of this project are particularly important for hospitals in Maryland, which are now operating under a unique all-payer model for hospital payments. Within this new payment structure, Maryland hospitals will have to meet ambitious spending, quality of care, and population health goals. Reducing avoidable use of emergency departments can help in reaching these goals.

The project provides promise not only for hospitals in Maryland but throughout the nation to improve health care experiences and outcomes for their patients. Shared learning systems were an integral component of the project so participants were learning from each other and sharing best practices throughout the project and that learning has now been documented and can be replicated in other communities.

“This was an incredibly rewarding project to work on,” says Barbara H. Eldridge, Manager of Quality Improvement at the Primary Care Coalition. “We created a learning system that permits us to sustain improved communication between patients and their providers, between hospital discharge planners and community based clinics, and across five hospitals operating in Montgomery County.” The initiative has proven successful in Montgomery County, Maryland and is being replicated in communities in other parts of the country. 

“Linking Uninsured Patients Treated In The Emergency Department To Primary Care Shows Some Promise In Maryland” was written by Theresa Y. Kim, Karoline Mortensen, and Barbara Eldridge and published in the journal Health Affairs

University Launches Dynamic, Interactive Information Website UMD Right Now

December 4, 2012
Contacts: 

Crystal Brown 301-405-4618 crystalb@umd.edu

College Park, Md. – Today, the University of Maryland launched a brand-new multimedia news and information portal, UMD Right Now, which provides members of the media and the public with real-time information on the university and its extended community.

UMD Right Now replaces Newsdesk, which previously served as the university’s news hub and central resource for members of the media. The new site is aimed at reaching broader audiences and allows visitors to keep up with the latest Maryland news and events, view photos and videos and connect with the university across all of its social media platforms.

“We designed UMD Right Now to be a comprehensive, vibrant site where visitors can find new and exciting things happening at Maryland,” said Linda Martin, executive director, Web and New Media Strategies. “Through social media, video, photos and news information, we hope to engage visitors and compel the community to explore all that Maryland has to offer.”

The new website, umdrightnow.umd.edu, contains up-to-date news releases and announcements, facts and figures about the university, a searchable database of faculty and staff experts, information highlighting innovation and entrepreneurship at UMD, additional resources for news media and other campus and athletics news.

“UMD RightNow is the place to go to find out all the things happening on and around campus on any given day,” said Crystal Brown, chief communications officer. “This website brings real-time news, events and information right to your fingertips.”

For more information and contact information for the Office of University Communications, please visit umdrightnow.umd.edu.

University of Maryland Statement on Amicus Brief in Support of DACA - October 11, 2019

October 11, 2019
Contacts: 

Hafsa Siddiqi, hafsa@umd.edu, 301-405-4671

The University of Maryland has joined 164 colleges and universities across the nation to support a legal challenge to rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Filed in federal court last week and coordinated by the Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration, the amicus brief seeks to advocate for the rights of roughly 700,000 young immigrants to study and work in the United States under legal protection. The brief further argues that revoking DACA status for the thousands of students across private, public and community institutions is not only unethical but unconstitutional. 

 

“As institutions of higher education, we see every day the achievement and potential of these young people, and we think it imperative for both us and them that they be allowed to remain here and live out their dreams,” wrote the signatories in the brief. “Once at college or university, DACA recipients are among the most engaged students both academically and otherwise. They work hard in the classroom and become deeply engaged in co-curricular activities, supporting communities on and off-campus. Indeed, it defies rationality to prevent the government from utilizing its discretion to protect this set of young people from removal.” 

 

On Nov. 12, the Supreme Court is scheduled to hear oral arguments on a series of consolidated cases and determine whether the administration’s rescission of DACA was lawful.

 

DACA recipients help build and nourish Maryland’s robust community, from their academic excellence in research and science to their entrepreneurial and industrial spirit through business and the arts. The university will continue to identify avenues for offering support to our DACA students and advocate for a restoration of their legal protections.  

UMD Researchers Discover New Mechanism in Liver that Helps Prevent Infections

October 9, 2019
Contacts: 
Samantha Watters 301-405-2434, Leon Tune 301-405-4679

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- A UMD team of researchers has made a breakthrough in understanding how our immune system deals with invasive fungal infections that are a major health threat, particularly to people who are immuno-compromized. Led by Meiqing Shi, associate professor with the University of Maryland Department of Veterinary Medicine, the researchers discovered a pathway in the liver by which immune system cells called macrophages capture  and “eat” fungi before the fungi spread to target organs like the brain and kidney. 

This pathway explains why individuals with liver disease have enhanced risk of fungal infection, and also points to possible new therapeutic options for preventing these infections, which annually kill some 1.5 million people.

“Under intravital microscopy [a  tool to study cell biology in living animals], we can directly see how the KCs catch fungi in real time,” said Shi. KCs (Kupffer cells) are liver-resident macrophages that constitute some 90 percent of the total tissue macrophages in the body.

“This is a protective mechanism that is working once the fungus becomes invasive, or gets into the bloodstream, to prevent it from spreading. Stopping the dissemination process throughout the body is so important, because once you get dissemination, you get the disease, Shi said. “These findings suggest therapeutic strategies for preventing dissemination, and this could be applied across many types of fungal infections, since they work in similar ways.”

Fungal infections affect 1.2 billion people globally each year. In the current paper, Shi and colleagues specifically examined two types of fungi - Cryptococcus neoformans and Candida albicans. Both of these fungi, if disseminated to their target organs (the brain for Cryptococcus and the kidney for Candida), are fatal infections that are very difficult to treat once contracted. Cryptococcus, for example, is the main cause of meningitis. Each year, more than a million people are infected and contract meningitis, and 60 percent of these will die from the disease. HIV infection is the main risk factor for cryptococcal meningoencephalitis, but the use of immunosuppressive drugs also increases patient susceptibility.

“Cryptococcus and Candida are fungi that are actually everywhere,” says Shi. “People with healthy immune systems can usually control the fungi after infection, but once it gets into the bloodstream, either one of these fungi can get into the target organs and become fatal. For Cryptococcus, this is especially a problem for those with impaired immune systems, like HIV patients or organ transplant patients. Patients with liver disease are also more prone to Cryptococcus infection, and no one understood why before.” 

This new discovery that liver macrophages (KCs) are responsible for catching free fungi in the bloodstream to prevent further dissemination helps explain this phenomenon, since if the liver is impaired as it is in patients with liver disease, it would stand to reason that this protective mechanism would also be impaired. 

“This finding is very interesting and very unusual, because in the field of fungal infections, nobody focuses on the liver,” says Shi. “Researchers tend to look at the target organs like the brain or kidney. The liver is not a target organ, but it tries to clean out the fungus in the bloodstream. As the whole body is connected, this paper gives a more whole system approach to how fungal dissemination interacts in the entire body.”

With this whole body approach in mind, the discovery of this mechanism has implications not just for those with liver disease, but for the treatment of fungal infections as a whole by targeting this mechanism, preventing fungal dissemination, and treating invasive fungal infections. 

The paper, entitled “Fungal dissemination is limited by liver macrophage filtration of the blood,” is published in Nature Communications, DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12381-5

This work is funded by the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, grant AI131219. 

UMD Prevention Research Center to Focus on LGBTQ Mental Health with new $3.75M from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

October 8, 2019
Contacts: 

Kelly Blake, kellyb@umd.edu, 301-405-9418

The University of Maryland Prevention Research Center (UMD-PRC) is working to improve

mental health and health care for LGBTQ+ people with new funding from the U.S. Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

Through a new cooperative agreement that supports a select group of national prevention

research centers, the CDC is funding the UMD-PRC’s research, service and training efforts with$3.75 million over five years (2019-2024).

 

“We are proud to be one of only 25 academic institutions to receive CDC funding for our

Prevention Research Center,” said Dr. Laurie Locascio, Vice President for Research at the

University of Maryland. “I am hopeful about the difference that our University of Maryland

research leaders can make in improving mental health for the underserved LGBTQ community across the United States.”

 

This initiative brings together a diverse team of researchers from the University of Maryland,

College Park’s School of Public Health, along with a growing coalition of LGBTQ+, mental health and health care organizations and community partners.

 

“The University of Maryland is a recognized leader in supporting LGBTQ health and wellbeing,” said Dr. Brad Boekeloo, a professor of behavioral and community health who is the director and principal investigator for the UMD Prevention Research Center. “In addition to our expertise in the School of Public Health, we have resources across the UMD campus, including the LGBT Equity Center, the Office of Diversity and Inclusion, the LGBTQ Studies Program and the College of Education to support us in our mission to address LGBTQ+ mental health disparities. We also have students, community partners and people from the communities we want to serve on our team. We’re all working together to serve and lift up the most vulnerable LGBTQ people.”

 

Beginning in 2009, the UMD Prevention Research Center focused on research to inform HIV

prevention plans and intervention programs in Maryland and the Washington, DC region. It will continue to partner with health departments and community organizations on its mission, now expanded to prioritize LGBTQ+ mental health and health care.

 

“The LGBTQ community faces significant barriers to health equity, ranging from policies and

practices that exclude rights and protections, to everyday experiences that are related to

discrimination, stigma and violence. These things keep LGBTQ people from living healthier lives,” said Dr. Jessica Fish, an assistant professor of family science and a core research scientist with the UMD-PRC. “So, the Prevention Research Center is dedicated to trying to elevate awareness, knowledge and competent training for mental health care providers so that it can be a pathway to wellness for this population.”

 

Among the UMD-PRC’s priorities, it will focus on implementing and evaluating a LGBTQ+ cultural competency training to equip mental health care providers with the sensitivity and knowledge needed to work with clients of diverse gender identities and sexual orientations. The curriculum, which has been developed by Sean Lare and Michael Vigorito, two clinicians who are part of the PRC team, includes a combination of training and technical. It has already been delivered in Washington, DC, Maryland, and Virginia by the UMD-PRC with a grant from the District of Columbia Department of Health over the last three years.

 

“I've heard the need from clinicians of how they can better support their LGB and transgender

clients and patients,” said Sean Lare, a licensed clinical social worker who specializes in serving LGBTQ+ individuals and their families. “My work with the PRC offers a unique opportunity to develop that training program piece that will increase that capacity for individual providers in their one-on-one work with people, but also to influence the culture of the agency or organization they are working within.”

 

The UMD-PRC will assess the success of these trainings and how well mental health providers improved in their LGBTQ+ cultural sensitivity and competence through simulated online clinic sessions using actors. In addition to training mental health care providers and serving as a hub to connect providers, researchers, and LGBTQ+ individuals and allies, the UMD-PRC team also aims to provide the scientific evidence to inform health systems, policies and practices that support LGBTQ health.

 

Topics that PRC research will provide evidence to inform may include:

 

  • The creation of health insurance policies that are more inclusive of LGBT individuals and families, and sensitive to their mental health needs
  • Policies and legislation that would ban conversion therapy and other discriminatory pseudoscientific approaches
  • Support for LGBTQ youth and parents in child welfare systems
  • The creation of more gender-inclusive facilities
  • Increasing mental health care access for LGBTQ people in rural areas
  • Preventing substance abuse in LGBTQ youth

 

UMD-PRC Director Brad Boekeloo is proud of the niche that the UMD Prevention Research

Center is playing as one of the only academic research centers focused on the mental health and well-being of the LGBTQ community.

 

LGBTQ people face stigma, discrimination and violence in many settings, and may avoid medical care as a result. By increasing the availability of affirming and supportive mental health care for the community, Dr. Boekeloo and the UMD-PRC team hope that it may also increase the use of other health care services and create a pathway to overall wellness.

 

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Student Voter Participation at University of Maryland Increased by 27 Percent in 2018

October 7, 2019
Contacts: 

Patrick Saumell, 443-886-4084

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland today reported that student voting on campus was up in last year’s mid-year election, increasing to 46 percent in 2018 from a rate of 19.3 percent in 2014. The full campus report can be viewed here. 

UMD’s joint student and faculty chaired TerpsVote Coalition played a vital role in promoting voter education and engagement. Throughout the fall 2018 semester, TerpsVote led a campaign to engage students on voting through classroom presentations, registration drives, early voting buses, and free stamps and envelopes for absentee voting.

"Reaching a 46 percent student voting rate during a midterm election is a huge milestone, but we're already preparing for next fall’s presidential election,” said Patrick Saumell, Student Co-Chair for the TerpsVote Coalition. “Increasing student engagement requires reducing informational and psychological barriers to voting. As a result, we're working with student and faculty stakeholders to increase education about voting and promote a civically inclined campus culture over the next year."

The latest report is part of the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement, or NSLVE, conducted by the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) at Tufts University’s Tisch College of Civic Life. The study shows that nationwide, the voting rates at participating college campuses doubled on average compared to the previous 2014 midterm. In 2018, the Average Institutional Voting Rate (AIVR) among campuses in the study was 39.1 percent, nearly 20 percentage points higher than 2014’s average turnout rate of 19.7 percent. Turnout increases were widespread, with virtually all campuses seeing an improvement over 2014.

The NSLE is the only national study of college-student voting. It is based on the voting records of more than 10 million students at more than 1,000 colleges and universities in all 50 states and the District of Columbia; IDHE does not receive any information that could individually identify students or how they voted. The study provides reports to the University of Maryland and participating colleges and universities, which use them to support political learning and civic engagement, as well as to identify and address gaps in political and civic participation.

###

Part of Tufts University’s Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life, the Institute for Democracy & Higher Education (IDHE) is an applied research center focused on college and university student political learning and engagement in democracy. IDHE researchers study student voting, equity, campus conditions for student political learning, discourse, participation, and agency for underrepresented and marginalized students. IDHE's signature initiative, the National Study of Learning, Voting, and Engagement, or NSLVE, (https://idhe.tufts.edu/nslve) is a service to colleges and universities that provides participating institutions with tailored reports of their students' voting rates. Launched in 2013 with 250 campuses, the study now serves more than 1,000 institutions in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. 

TerpsVote is a non-partisan campus coalition working to promote voter engagement at the University of Maryland. TerpsVote's efforts range from increasing voter registration to spreading civic education to prepare UMD's student body for local, state, and national elections. For the fall of 2019, TerpsVote's primary goal is educating UMD to increase comprehension and engagement on voter procedures, local elections, and the census.

 

Pages

World's_leading_heme_researcher_UMD_Professor_Iqbal_Hamza
October 11
New finding is the latest of many discoveries led by UMD Professor Iqbal Hamza who is unraveling the mystery of heme, a... Read
October 9
Findings have implications for treatment of a variety of infections, including meningitis  Read
October 8
School of Public Health's Prevention Research Center will receive $3.75 million over five years from the CDC. Read