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UMD Capitol Hill Forum Addresses Health Disparities Research & Action for Equity

September 23, 2016
Contacts: 

Contacts: Elise Carbonaro, 301-405-6501

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland, in collaboration with Rep. John P. Sarbanes and the Big Ten Academic Alliance, recently convened more than 100 people for a Research on the Hill forum focused on strategies to achieve health equity at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C. Moderated by Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D., professor and director of the Maryland Center for Health Equity in the UMD School of Public Health, the panel discussion engaged experts from academia, federal health agencies and the private business sector in a candid conversation about how to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities among vulnerable populations.

“Our exploratory research holds the solutions to many of the most challenging problems of our day,” said UMD Vice President and Chief Research Officer Patrick G. O’Shea, Ph.D. “As a university, it is our mission to create and understand knowledge to develop better ways to house and heal and fuel and feed our people in advanced societies that are just, secure, and free. Achieving health equity touches on the ‘heal’ aspect of that mission.”

The topics ranged from the progress that has been made in access to medical care as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to challenges that still remain in improving quality of care and in making the medical care system incorporate public health and address the social determinants of health that prevent people from acting health promotion and disease prevention recommendations. 

“The state of Maryland has embraced the ACA and there is clear evidence that the new incentives are indeed moving hospital systems away from a fee-for-service business model to one that rewards quality care and positive health outcomes over the volume of procedures,” said Thomas. “While the transition is not perfect, our state is a national leader for what the future of health care will look like.”

Panel members shared examples of effective and innovative community-based health interventions and public-private partnerships that are making a difference through culturally-tailored health promotion and disease prevention services, and highlighted the emergence of social determinants of health such as poverty, discrimination and residential segregation as factors that must be overcome.

 “I’m convinced that if you address racial and ethnic disparities with respect to the delivery of health care and health care coverage in this country, you will build the best health care system we can possibly have because diversity is our country’s hallmark,” said Congressman Sarbanes, who, as a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has been a tireless advocate for improving healthcare quality and addressing health disparities.
 
To achieve health equity, researchers, policymakers, and industry leaders must address broader issues beyond the traditional biomedical model and build trust between those who control health care delivery system and those who have lost hope in the system, said members of the panel. 

The panelists recommended that health equity be incorporated into all public policies, not just those related to health care, to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities. 

Panel members included:

  • Margo Edmunds, Ph.D., Vice President, Evidence Generation and Translation at Academy Health;
  • J. Nadine Gracia, M.D., M.S.C.E., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director of the Office of Minority Health within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;
  • Julia Huggins, President of Cigna Mid-Atlantic;
  • Kolawole Okuyemi, M.D., MPH, Professor of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Director of the Program in Health Disparities Research and Inaugural Endowed Chair for Health Equity at the University of Minnesota; and
  • Eliseo Pérez-Stable, M.D., Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health.

House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer, who represents Maryland’s 5th Congressional District and is a distinguished UMD alumnus, also joined the event and emphasized that as an interconnected community, we should all care about health disparities.
 
“It is unacceptable that in the United States, where all are created equal in the words of our Declaration of Independence, that one’s access to healthcare may be higher or lower as a result of race, gender, or income,” said Congressman Hoyer. “Everybody being healthy is of concern to each and every one of us.”
 
He discussed how we must continue to defend the patient protections that Americans are benefiting from thanks to the ACA, such as the no-cost access to preventive services like mammograms and immunizations, as well as remind people of the dramatic increase in the number of people, particularly people of color, who now have health coverage as a result.

The event was held as part of the University of Maryland’s Research on the Hill series, which is aimed at raising awareness of research with great societal significance.

View the conversation at: https://youtu.be/HPedKr0jZLQ

UMD Study Finds Connecting Uninsured Patients to Primary Care Could Reduce ER Use

May 6, 2015
Contacts: 

Kelly Blake 301-405-9418
Hillery Tsumba 301-628-3425

Montgomery County, Md. Initiative Could Improve Health, Reduce Costs

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – An intervention to connect low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to a reliable source of primary health care shows promise for reducing avoidable use of hospital emergency departments in Maryland. A University of Maryland School of Public Health study evaluating the results of the intervention was published this week in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs

For twenty years, use of hospital emergency departments has been on the rise in the United States, particularly among low-income patients who face barriers to accessing health care outside of hospitals, including not having an identifiable primary health care provider. Almost half of emergency room visits are considered “avoidable.” The Emergency Department-Primary Care Connect Initiative of the Primary Care Coalition, which ran from 2009 through 2011, linked low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to safety-net health clinics. 

“Our study found that uninsured patients with chronic health issues – such as those suffering from hypertension, diabetes, asthma, COPD, congestive heart failure, depression or anxiety – relied less on the emergency department after they were linked to a local health clinic for ongoing care,” says Dr. Karoline Mortensen, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and senior researcher. “Connecting patients to primary care and expanding the availability of these safety-net clinics could reduce emergency department visits and provide better continuity of care for vulnerable populations.”  

Funded by a grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the initiative engaged all five of the hospitals operating in Montgomery County, Maryland at the time, and four safety-net clinics serving low-income patients. Using “patient navigators,” individuals trained to help patients find the care they need and can afford, these hospitals referred more than 10,000 low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients who visited emergency departments to four local primary care clinics, with the goal of encouraging them to establish an ongoing relationship with the clinic and reduce their reliance on costly emergency department care. 

Two hospitals in Montgomery County who participated in the intervention continued the program after the initial grant period concluded because of the benefits they saw for patients and for reducing emergency department visits and associated costs. These hospitals are currently testing a new version of the intervention specifically deigned to link emergency department patients with behavioral health conditions to appropriate community-based services. 

While hospital administrators and health policy experts throughout the country are recognizing that access to primary care improves continuity of care for patients and reduces avoidable use of emergency departments, the implications of this project are particularly important for hospitals in Maryland, which are now operating under a unique all-payer model for hospital payments. Within this new payment structure, Maryland hospitals will have to meet ambitious spending, quality of care, and population health goals. Reducing avoidable use of emergency departments can help in reaching these goals.

The project provides promise not only for hospitals in Maryland but throughout the nation to improve health care experiences and outcomes for their patients. Shared learning systems were an integral component of the project so participants were learning from each other and sharing best practices throughout the project and that learning has now been documented and can be replicated in other communities.

“This was an incredibly rewarding project to work on,” says Barbara H. Eldridge, Manager of Quality Improvement at the Primary Care Coalition. “We created a learning system that permits us to sustain improved communication between patients and their providers, between hospital discharge planners and community based clinics, and across five hospitals operating in Montgomery County.” The initiative has proven successful in Montgomery County, Maryland and is being replicated in communities in other parts of the country. 

“Linking Uninsured Patients Treated In The Emergency Department To Primary Care Shows Some Promise In Maryland” was written by Theresa Y. Kim, Karoline Mortensen, and Barbara Eldridge and published in the journal Health Affairs

University Launches Dynamic, Interactive Information Website UMD Right Now

December 4, 2012
Contacts: 

Crystal Brown 301-405-4618 crystalb@umd.edu

College Park, Md. – Today, the University of Maryland launched a brand-new multimedia news and information portal, UMD Right Now, which provides members of the media and the public with real-time information on the university and its extended community.

UMD Right Now replaces Newsdesk, which previously served as the university’s news hub and central resource for members of the media. The new site is aimed at reaching broader audiences and allows visitors to keep up with the latest Maryland news and events, view photos and videos and connect with the university across all of its social media platforms.

“We designed UMD Right Now to be a comprehensive, vibrant site where visitors can find new and exciting things happening at Maryland,” said Linda Martin, executive director, Web and New Media Strategies. “Through social media, video, photos and news information, we hope to engage visitors and compel the community to explore all that Maryland has to offer.”

The new website, umdrightnow.umd.edu, contains up-to-date news releases and announcements, facts and figures about the university, a searchable database of faculty and staff experts, information highlighting innovation and entrepreneurship at UMD, additional resources for news media and other campus and athletics news.

“UMD RightNow is the place to go to find out all the things happening on and around campus on any given day,” said Crystal Brown, chief communications officer. “This website brings real-time news, events and information right to your fingertips.”

For more information and contact information for the Office of University Communications, please visit umdrightnow.umd.edu.

Annual Survey Finds Bee Loss Somewhat Reduced at 33 Percent

May 25, 2017
Contacts: 

Matthew Wright, 301-405-9267

 

 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Beekeepers across the United States lost 33 percent of their honey bee colonies during the year spanning April 2016 to April 2017, according to the latest preliminary results of an annual nationwide survey. Rates of both winter loss and summer loss—and consequently, total annual losses—improved compared with recent years.

“While it is encouraging that losses are lower than in the past, I would stop short of calling this ‘good’ news,” said Dennis vanEngelsdorp, an assistant professor of entomology at the University of Maryland and project director for the Bee Informed Partnership. “Colony loss of more than 30 percent over the entire year is high. It’s hard to imagine any other agricultural sector being able to stay in business with such consistently high losses.”

The survey, which is conducted each year by the nonprofit Bee Informed Partnership in collaboration with the Apiary Inspectors of America, found total annual losses in 2016-17 were the lowest since 2011-12, when the survey recorded less than 29 percent of colonies lost throughout the year. Winter losses last year were the lowest recorded since the survey began in 2006-07. 

According to vanEngelsdorp, the primary reason for the drop in colony loss appears to be that efforts by beekeepers to control varroa mite infestations were more successful during the past year.  Among the many different factors that contribute to colony losses, the lethal varroa mite parasite is considered to be at the top of the list. 

In the fall months of 2016, varroa mite levels across the country were noticeably lower in most beekeeping operations compared with past years. The researchers said this is likely due to increased vigilance on the part of beekeepers, a greater availability of mite control products and environmental conditions that favored the use of timely and effective mite control measures. For example, some mite control products contain essential oils that break down at high temperatures, but many parts of the country experienced relatively mild temperatures in the spring and early summer of 2016.

Beekeepers who responded to the 2015-16 survey lost a total of 33.2 percent of their colonies over the course of the year. This marks a decrease of 7.3 percentage points over the previous study year (2015-16), when loss rates were found to be 40.5 percent. Winter loss rates decreased from 26.9 percent in the previous winter to 21.1 percent this past winter, while summer loss rates decreased from 23.6 percent to 18.1 percent.

The survey asks both commercial and small-scale beekeepers to track the survival rates of their honey bee colonies. Survey results for this year and all previous years are publicly available on the Bee Informed website.

“This is a complex problem,” said Kelly Kulhanek, a graduate student in the UMD Department of Entomology who helped with the survey. “Lower losses are a great start, but it’s important to remember that 33 percent is still much higher than beekeepers deem acceptable. There is still much work to do.”

In addition to the varroa mite, factors contributing to colony losses include other parasites, such as the gut parasite Nosema, and viral and bacterial diseases. Poor nutrition (due in part to loss of natural foraging habitat) and pesticide exposure also take a toll, especially among commercial beekeepers. These and other stressors are likely to synergize with each other to compound the problem, the researchers said.

This is the 11th year of the winter loss survey, and the seventh year to include summer and annual losses. More than 4,900 beekeepers from all 50 states and the District of Columbia responded to this year’s survey. All told, these beekeepers manage about 13 percent of the nation’s estimated 2.78 million honey bee colonies.

The survey is part of a larger research effort to understand why honey bee colonies are in such poor health, and what can be done to manage the situation. Some crops, such as almonds, depend entirely on honey bees for pollination. Honey bees pollinate an estimated $15 billion worth of crops in the U.S. annually.

“Bees are good indicators of the health of the landscape as a whole,” said Nathalie Steinhauer, a graduate student in the UMD Department of Entomology who leads the data collection efforts for the annual survey. “Honey bees are strongly affected by the quality of their environment, including flower diversity, contaminants and pests. To keep healthy bees, you need a good environment and you need your neighbors to keep healthy bees. Honey bee health is a community matter.”

2016-2017 survey results as well as previous years’ results are publicly available on the Bee Informed Partnership’s website.

 

UMD Responds to Tragedy: University Community Grieves Loss of Life on Campus, Offers Resources and Moment of Reflection

May 22, 2017

Statement from University of Maryland President Wallace D. Loh, Office of Diversity & Inclusion, Faculty Staff Assistance Program in the University Health Center, LGBT Equity Center, Nyumburu Cultural Center, Office of Civil Rights & Sexual Misconduct, Office of Community Engagement, Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Education, Office of Multicultural Involvement & Community Advocacy, President’s Commission on Ethnic Minority Issues, University Counseling Center and University of Maryland Police Department: 

We are devastated by the murder of Second Lieutenant Richard Collins III this weekend. We are devastated by the racism and hate that exists in this world.  And we are devastated that hate may have played a role in this and other horrific crimes across the country.

We want each of us to have the space and time they need to grieve and we need to collectively honor this young man’s life, offer our support to the other communities mourning right now, especially Bowie State University, and simultaneously find a path forward as a community.

We want to begin by making sure our community understands how they can be supported in the next week.  Here are collective resources you should be aware of:

  • Tuesday, May 23, 12-1:30pm, A place to gather, to share our thoughts and experiences with one another in a supportive environment.

- MICA Conference Room in the Stamp Student Union. Please note: This is specifically a space for students.

- Nyumburu Cultural Center Conference Room 0120. Facilitated by the Office of Diversity & Inclusion and the Counseling Center, this is a space for students, staff, and faculty.

- LGBT Equity Center in 2218 Marie Mount Hall.  This is a space for students, faculty, and staff.

  • Thursday, May 25th, 3pm-4:30pm, A place to gather, to share our thoughts and experiences with one another in a supportive environment.

- MICA Conference Room in the Stamp Student Union. Please note: This is specifically a space for students.

- LGBT Equity Center in 2218 Marie Mount Hall.  This is a space for students, faculty, and staff.

  • Counseling: For those able to come to campus, the University Counseling Center has established special drop-in hours anytime Monday - Friday between 8:30 am to 4:30 pm to meet with a counselor.  During evening and weekend hours, you may call the counseling center 301-314-7651 and receive immediate, brief support from a counselor by phone. For faculty and staff, the Faculty Staff Assistance Program is also available for support.
  • Wednesday, May 24, 1pm, Garden of Reflection of Remembrance, Memorial Chapel. We invite the campus community to join us for a moment of reflection hosted by the University Chaplains, to honor Lieutenant Collins and to stand in solidarity with his family, friends and the entire Bowie State University community.
  • Thursday, May 25, 11am-12pm, a community Twitter conversation about how to recover from racial trauma. We recognize that many of you are not physically present on campus, but are in need of community at this time.  We invite all students, faculty and staff to join in a supportive Twitter conversation, facilitated by the University Counseling Center. Please note this is not a confidential space.

The University is working closely with Bowie State University to help them celebrate their commencement exercises on campus tomorrow morning.  They very much appreciate the outpouring of support for their community.

We understand this may impact people differently, with a range of experiences and emotions.  That is okay. Please make a point of connecting with each other, taking care of yourself, and be gentle with yourself.

Please remember that you can report hate/bias through the University of Maryland Police Department or the Office of Civil Rights and Sexual Misconduct (OCRSM), which is responsible for monitoring the university’s civil rights response. Visit OCRSM online to report or learn more.

Our community of nearly 400,000 students, faculty, staff and alumni can be a powerful force for good. Together, and only together, can we fight back against hate in all its insidious forms.  We are building a coalition of individuals and groups across campus dedicated to ensuring an environment where we fight back against hate and bias, and where we can all thrive.

University Statement Regarding 2017 Student Commencement Speaker

May 22, 2017
Contacts: 

Katie Lawson, lawsonk@umd.edu, 301-405-4622

Statement from the University of Maryland:

"The University of Maryland, like all public universities, is a marketplace of ideas. It is a place founded on academic freedom, the freedom of expression, and the right of every individual to share their thoughts and views in a welcoming and nurturing academic environment.

As a top student, Shuping Yang was selected by committee to deliver remarks during our university's commencement exercises on Sunday, May 21. She expressed her appreciation for the opportunity to study in the United States at the University of Maryland and shared her views on aspects of that experience.

The University believes that to be an informed global citizen it is critical to hear different viewpoints, to embrace diversity, and demonstrate tolerance when faced with views with which we may disagree. Listening to and respectfully engaging with those whom we disagree are essential skills, both within university walls and beyond.

The University proudly supports Shuping's right to share her views and her unique perspectives and we commend her on lending her voice on this joyous occasion."
 
View Shuping Yang’s personal statement here:
https://m.weibo.cn/status/4110271301535592?wm=3333_2001
 

President Wallace D. Loh Statement on May 20, 2017 Campus Tragedy: Update

May 21, 2017

Update from President Wallace D. Loh on May 20, 2017 campus tragedy:

The horrific assault that took the life of a young man on our campus on Saturday morning has shocked, saddened, and angered our community and beyond.

His name is Richard W. Collins III, an African-American student at Bowie State University (BSU) who was recently commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. Army.  Lt. Collins was scheduled to graduate this Tuesday.

The suspect is Sean Urbanski, a UMD student. He has been charged by the University of Maryland Police Department (UMPD) with first- and second-degree murder and first-degree assault. He is being held without bond.

New information obtained today from witnesses and other sources has led law enforcement officials to consider a hate-bias motive in this case. To ensure a comprehensive investigation, UMPD today asked the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to provide technical and forensic expertise, which it agreed to do. Prince George's County Police Department is also part of the investigative team.

It is essential that law enforcement agencies have the time to conduct the thorough investigation needed for law and justice to prevail. I have requested that they provide periodic updates to the UMD and BSU communities, as appropriate.

The safety of our campus community remains a top priority. UMPD has increased substantially its visible patrols, on and off campus. The Prince George's County Police has also increased its patrols in the College Park community. UMPD is monitoring 24/7 the hundreds of video security cameras throughout the campus. The Department of Transportation Services has initiated NITE Ride, a curb-to-curb bus service that runs from dusk to 6 AM. 

However, increased police security is not sufficient. We must all do more to nurture a climate -- on campus and beyond -- where we stand against hate, we fight against hate crimes, and we reaffirm the values that define us a university and as a democracy.

As we search for answers to this senseless crime, please continue to keep the family and friends of Lt. Collins, and the BSU community, in your thoughts and prayers. We all grieve together for a promising life ended far too early. 

President Wallace D. Loh Statement on May 20, 2017 campus tragedy

May 20, 2017
Statement from President Wallace D. Loh on May 20, 2017 campus tragedy: 
 

I am writing to all of you today with a heavy heart. This morning, shortly after 3 a.m., a male student from Bowie State University was assaulted with a knife on Regents Drive near Montgomery Hall. He was taken to a local hospital where he died from his injuries. 

 

The suspect, a male University of Maryland student, was immediately apprehended and taken into University of Maryland Police Department custody. The investigation into the circumstances of the assault is underway, and charges are pending.

 

Words cannot express my deep anguish over this horrific tragedy. My deepest condolences go out to the family and friends of the victim, and to the entire Bowie State community. I ask that every member of our campus community join me in keeping the victim’s family in their thoughts and prayers. 

 

There is strength in our unity as we grieve. For this reason and in solidarity with the Bowie State community, we will honor a moment of silence to begin tomorrow's commencement exercises.

 

In addition, counselors are available today from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at the Counseling Center in Shoemaker Hall for any members of our community who need support. 

UMD Names Laurie E. Locascio Vice President for Research

May 17, 2017
Contacts: 

Katie Lawson, 301-405-4622

Laurie E. LocascioCOLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland has named Laurie E. Locascio as its new Vice President for Research, effective October 1, 2017. In this role, Locascio will be responsible for sustaining strong growth and excellence in the university’s research programs.

For the past 30 years, Locascio has worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Md., rising from a research biomedical engineer to senior leadership positions.

“Dr. Locascio brings just what our research enterprise needs to thrive in this increasingly competitive environment,” said University of Maryland President Wallace D. Loh. “In addition to her great scholarship and innovation, she has a remarkable ability to create strategic partnerships. Laurie will lead us into a vibrant research future.”

Locascio is currently acting as the Principal Deputy Director and Associate Director for Laboratory Programs at NIST providing leadership and operational guidance for NIST's seven scientific and mission-focused laboratories.

“It is an honor to be joining one of the nation’s top research universities to spearhead transformative work,” said Locascio. “I look forward to leading UMD’s research enterprise of more than a half a billion dollars directed at groundbreaking work taking place across campus.”

Previously, Locascio directed the Material Measurement Laboratory (MML), one of NIST's largest scientific labs, overseeing 1,000 research staff in eight locations around the U.S. and a $170M annual budget. As MML Director, she recruited top talent, fostered excellence, and built a collegial and collaborative workplace. She implemented strategic partnerships with universities, industry, and other government labs, including a partnership with UMD's Institute for Bioscience and Biotechnology Research at Shady Grove. Prior to that, Locascio served as chief of the Biochemical Sciences Division in the MML.

Locascio’s most recent honors and awards include the 2017 American Chemical Society Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management, and the 2017 Washington Academy of Sciences Special Award in Scientific Leadership.  A Fellow of the American Chemical Society, of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, and of the Washington Academy of Sciences, she has published 115 scientific articles and has been awarded 11 patents.

Locascio received a B.S. in chemistry from James Madison University, a M.S. in bioengineering from the University of Utah, and a Ph.D. in toxicology from the University of Maryland, Baltimore.

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University of Maryland Scientists Unveil First-Ever Study of Urbanization Impact on Soils in Multiple Cities

May 16, 2017

College Park, MD -- Urban soils provide extensive ecosystem services that properly regulate the surrounding environment for all living organisms. Nutrient management, water purification and plant growth are on the short list, but these can become compromised by urbanization. To understand the deeper effects of urbanization on city soils, a team of researchers, including Stephanie Yarwood, associate professor in UMD’s Environmental Science and Technology Department, have published a first-of-its-kind study examining microbial communities in these soils within five different cities. Results uncovered an alarming decrease in ectomycorrhizal fungi, an important organism that enhances plant growth and improves overall health of soils through stabilization and aggregation. This study offers clear evidence of how human urbanization may lead to a decline in diversity of unique populations of microbes on a global scale, in some cases those that have profound implications for human quality of life.

Photo of Urban GreenspaceRecent research suggests that human health is improved when the city includes abundant greenspace. Trees are fundamental to improving air quality and are proven locations for individuals to relieve stress. Ectomycorrhizal fungi help trees take up water, mineral salts and metabolites and can also fight off harmful parasites, predators and soil pathogens. Indeed, many trees are highly dependant on their fungal partners and in areas of poor soil, might not even survive without them. The absence of these fungi in soils in urban locations results in nutrient deficiencies that may require the addition of synthetic fertilizers. 

Through an examination of the biogeography (distribution of species among different geographical areas) of microbial communities, Yarwood determined that there are unique local populations of ectomycorrhizae. Due to the overall decrease in these organisms, combined with the existence of increasing local populations, it is believed that urbanization contributes to a loss of global biodiversity.

“We are excited to unveil this first-ever comparison of five cities on three continents to report an important, impactful global trend, versus a single study and location which has been tackled in the past,” said Yarwood, PhD, of UMD’s College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. “This study demonstrates the need to maintain viable soil and plant areas that continue to serve as natural habitats for microorganisms such as ectomycorrhizae. At its core, this is a human health issue, and we hope our research influences city residents to become more aware of the importance of improving their soils.”

To facilitate this widespread understanding of the effects of urbanization on microbial communities, Yarwood and her team collected samples from five cities – Baltimore (USA), Helsinki (Finland), Lahti, (Finland), Budapest (Hungary), and Potchefstroom (South Africa) – as part of the Global Urban Soil Ecological Education Network, an innovative grassroots effort to coordinate international research about the effects of urbanization on microbial communities. Yarwood hopes these efforts will serve as a model for valuable new insights into emerging global trends.

The study “Urbanization erodes ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity and may cause microbial communities to converge” by Yarwood and colleagues from the USDA Forest Service, Johns Hopkins University, University of Helsinki, North-West University (South Africa), University of Veterinary Science (Budapest) and the Hungarian Academy of Sciences,  was recently published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution. 


Image Credit: Creative Commons License 

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