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University of Maryland Statement Against Hate and Bias

November 5, 2017
Contacts: 

 Katie Lawson, 301-405-4622

 
Statement Against Hate and Bias 
Joel Seligman, AVP for Communications and Marketing - November 5, 2017
 

UMD sincerely regrets the overwhelming misunderstanding resulting in the #UMDNotAHome social media conversation. The statements on social media connected to this hashtag do not reflect the positions of the university or our leaders' mutual commitment to diversity and inclusion on campus and across our nation.

To put it plainly, the UMD administration stands against hate and bias in all of its forms and wants every Terp to feel welcome, safe and at home at the University of Maryland. 

In recent months, there have been instances of intentional provocation by hateful, far-right groups spreading targeted messages that the administration finds despicable. These outside agitators want to divide our campus community into factions that are in conflict with one another from within UMD, rather than see our campus stand together in opposition to the broader forces of hate, white supremacy, anti-immigrant xenophobia, homophobia, transphobia and anti-semitism. 

It is understandable that some members of our community are also disturbed by remarks by university officials, even when the comments are quoted entirely out of context and in a manner that misrepresents the meaning. UMD has seen an example of one of our longtime colleagues unfairly criticized for her efforts to provide legal advice to the University Senate Campus Affairs Committee literally at the same time she is working to advance the cause of inclusion.

The administration encourages all members of our community to work together—students, faculty, staff, administrators and alumni—to increase respect, inclusiveness, and cohesiveness on our campus. A comprehensive list of efforts underway by UMD administration is available at umd.edu/umdreflects 

 

 

UMD Named a 2017 Best College by MONEY Magazine

July 12, 2017
Contacts: 

Jennifer Burroughs, 301-405-4621

COLLEGE PARK, Md.  The University of Maryland ranked No. 11 among public universities according to MONEY Magazine’s 2017 list of Best Colleges. UMD ranked No. 20 overall among U.S. institutions. 

To calculate rankings, MONEY assessed more than 700 colleges in the U.S. based on three equally-weighted categories, including educational quality, affordability and alumni success. MONEY measured 27 factors within these categories covering areas such as instructor quality, measuring the study-to-faculty ratio, affordability for low-income students and value-added earnings, which measures if the school is launching students to better paying jobs. 

Earlier this year, UMD was also ranked a Best Value College by ForbesPrinceton Review and Kiplinger’s Personal Finance

UMD Capitol Hill Forum Addresses Health Disparities Research & Action for Equity

September 23, 2016
Contacts: 

Contacts: Elise Carbonaro, 301-405-6501

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – The University of Maryland, in collaboration with Rep. John P. Sarbanes and the Big Ten Academic Alliance, recently convened more than 100 people for a Research on the Hill forum focused on strategies to achieve health equity at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, D.C. Moderated by Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D., professor and director of the Maryland Center for Health Equity in the UMD School of Public Health, the panel discussion engaged experts from academia, federal health agencies and the private business sector in a candid conversation about how to eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities among vulnerable populations.

“Our exploratory research holds the solutions to many of the most challenging problems of our day,” said UMD Vice President and Chief Research Officer Patrick G. O’Shea, Ph.D. “As a university, it is our mission to create and understand knowledge to develop better ways to house and heal and fuel and feed our people in advanced societies that are just, secure, and free. Achieving health equity touches on the ‘heal’ aspect of that mission.”

The topics ranged from the progress that has been made in access to medical care as a result of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to challenges that still remain in improving quality of care and in making the medical care system incorporate public health and address the social determinants of health that prevent people from acting health promotion and disease prevention recommendations. 

“The state of Maryland has embraced the ACA and there is clear evidence that the new incentives are indeed moving hospital systems away from a fee-for-service business model to one that rewards quality care and positive health outcomes over the volume of procedures,” said Thomas. “While the transition is not perfect, our state is a national leader for what the future of health care will look like.”

Panel members shared examples of effective and innovative community-based health interventions and public-private partnerships that are making a difference through culturally-tailored health promotion and disease prevention services, and highlighted the emergence of social determinants of health such as poverty, discrimination and residential segregation as factors that must be overcome.

 “I’m convinced that if you address racial and ethnic disparities with respect to the delivery of health care and health care coverage in this country, you will build the best health care system we can possibly have because diversity is our country’s hallmark,” said Congressman Sarbanes, who, as a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, has been a tireless advocate for improving healthcare quality and addressing health disparities.
 
To achieve health equity, researchers, policymakers, and industry leaders must address broader issues beyond the traditional biomedical model and build trust between those who control health care delivery system and those who have lost hope in the system, said members of the panel. 

The panelists recommended that health equity be incorporated into all public policies, not just those related to health care, to reduce and ultimately eliminate health disparities. 

Panel members included:

  • Margo Edmunds, Ph.D., Vice President, Evidence Generation and Translation at Academy Health;
  • J. Nadine Gracia, M.D., M.S.C.E., Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health and Director of the Office of Minority Health within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services;
  • Julia Huggins, President of Cigna Mid-Atlantic;
  • Kolawole Okuyemi, M.D., MPH, Professor of the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Director of the Program in Health Disparities Research and Inaugural Endowed Chair for Health Equity at the University of Minnesota; and
  • Eliseo Pérez-Stable, M.D., Director of the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities at the National Institutes of Health.

House Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer, who represents Maryland’s 5th Congressional District and is a distinguished UMD alumnus, also joined the event and emphasized that as an interconnected community, we should all care about health disparities.
 
“It is unacceptable that in the United States, where all are created equal in the words of our Declaration of Independence, that one’s access to healthcare may be higher or lower as a result of race, gender, or income,” said Congressman Hoyer. “Everybody being healthy is of concern to each and every one of us.”
 
He discussed how we must continue to defend the patient protections that Americans are benefiting from thanks to the ACA, such as the no-cost access to preventive services like mammograms and immunizations, as well as remind people of the dramatic increase in the number of people, particularly people of color, who now have health coverage as a result.

The event was held as part of the University of Maryland’s Research on the Hill series, which is aimed at raising awareness of research with great societal significance.

View the conversation at: https://youtu.be/HPedKr0jZLQ

UMD Study Finds Connecting Uninsured Patients to Primary Care Could Reduce ER Use

May 6, 2015
Contacts: 

Kelly Blake 301-405-9418
Hillery Tsumba 301-628-3425

Montgomery County, Md. Initiative Could Improve Health, Reduce Costs

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – An intervention to connect low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to a reliable source of primary health care shows promise for reducing avoidable use of hospital emergency departments in Maryland. A University of Maryland School of Public Health study evaluating the results of the intervention was published this week in the May issue of the journal Health Affairs

For twenty years, use of hospital emergency departments has been on the rise in the United States, particularly among low-income patients who face barriers to accessing health care outside of hospitals, including not having an identifiable primary health care provider. Almost half of emergency room visits are considered “avoidable.” The Emergency Department-Primary Care Connect Initiative of the Primary Care Coalition, which ran from 2009 through 2011, linked low-income uninsured and Medicaid patients to safety-net health clinics. 

“Our study found that uninsured patients with chronic health issues – such as those suffering from hypertension, diabetes, asthma, COPD, congestive heart failure, depression or anxiety – relied less on the emergency department after they were linked to a local health clinic for ongoing care,” says Dr. Karoline Mortensen, assistant professor of health services administration at the University of Maryland School of Public Health and senior researcher. “Connecting patients to primary care and expanding the availability of these safety-net clinics could reduce emergency department visits and provide better continuity of care for vulnerable populations.”  

Funded by a grant from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, the initiative engaged all five of the hospitals operating in Montgomery County, Maryland at the time, and four safety-net clinics serving low-income patients. Using “patient navigators,” individuals trained to help patients find the care they need and can afford, these hospitals referred more than 10,000 low-income, uninsured and Medicaid patients who visited emergency departments to four local primary care clinics, with the goal of encouraging them to establish an ongoing relationship with the clinic and reduce their reliance on costly emergency department care. 

Two hospitals in Montgomery County who participated in the intervention continued the program after the initial grant period concluded because of the benefits they saw for patients and for reducing emergency department visits and associated costs. These hospitals are currently testing a new version of the intervention specifically deigned to link emergency department patients with behavioral health conditions to appropriate community-based services. 

While hospital administrators and health policy experts throughout the country are recognizing that access to primary care improves continuity of care for patients and reduces avoidable use of emergency departments, the implications of this project are particularly important for hospitals in Maryland, which are now operating under a unique all-payer model for hospital payments. Within this new payment structure, Maryland hospitals will have to meet ambitious spending, quality of care, and population health goals. Reducing avoidable use of emergency departments can help in reaching these goals.

The project provides promise not only for hospitals in Maryland but throughout the nation to improve health care experiences and outcomes for their patients. Shared learning systems were an integral component of the project so participants were learning from each other and sharing best practices throughout the project and that learning has now been documented and can be replicated in other communities.

“This was an incredibly rewarding project to work on,” says Barbara H. Eldridge, Manager of Quality Improvement at the Primary Care Coalition. “We created a learning system that permits us to sustain improved communication between patients and their providers, between hospital discharge planners and community based clinics, and across five hospitals operating in Montgomery County.” The initiative has proven successful in Montgomery County, Maryland and is being replicated in communities in other parts of the country. 

“Linking Uninsured Patients Treated In The Emergency Department To Primary Care Shows Some Promise In Maryland” was written by Theresa Y. Kim, Karoline Mortensen, and Barbara Eldridge and published in the journal Health Affairs

University Launches Dynamic, Interactive Information Website UMD Right Now

December 4, 2012
Contacts: 

Crystal Brown 301-405-4618 crystalb@umd.edu

College Park, Md. – Today, the University of Maryland launched a brand-new multimedia news and information portal, UMD Right Now, which provides members of the media and the public with real-time information on the university and its extended community.

UMD Right Now replaces Newsdesk, which previously served as the university’s news hub and central resource for members of the media. The new site is aimed at reaching broader audiences and allows visitors to keep up with the latest Maryland news and events, view photos and videos and connect with the university across all of its social media platforms.

“We designed UMD Right Now to be a comprehensive, vibrant site where visitors can find new and exciting things happening at Maryland,” said Linda Martin, executive director, Web and New Media Strategies. “Through social media, video, photos and news information, we hope to engage visitors and compel the community to explore all that Maryland has to offer.”

The new website, umdrightnow.umd.edu, contains up-to-date news releases and announcements, facts and figures about the university, a searchable database of faculty and staff experts, information highlighting innovation and entrepreneurship at UMD, additional resources for news media and other campus and athletics news.

“UMD RightNow is the place to go to find out all the things happening on and around campus on any given day,” said Crystal Brown, chief communications officer. “This website brings real-time news, events and information right to your fingertips.”

For more information and contact information for the Office of University Communications, please visit umdrightnow.umd.edu.

University of Maryland Named a Fulbright Program Top Producing Institution

February 22, 2018
Contacts: 

Jennifer Burroughs, 301-405-4621

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- The University of Maryland has been recognized as a top producer of Fulbright U.S. Students and Scholars by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Listed among research institutions, UMD is one of only 16 schools to be represented in both categories. 

For the 2017-2018 academic year, eleven students and alumni accepted Fulbright student grants to travel across the globe to conduct research and/or teach english abroad for individually designed projects; and seven scholars, faculty & staff members were selected to conduct research, lecture, and/or consult with other scholars and institutions abroad through a variety of international program awards. 

Read more about UMD’s Fulbright winners

Each year, the Fulbright Program awards approximately 8,000 grants annually. Roughly 1,900 U.S. students, 4,000 foreign students, 1,200 U.S. scholars, and 900 visiting scholars receive awards, in addition to several hundred teachers and professionals. More than 380,000 "Fulbrighters" from over 160 countries have participated in the program since its inception in 1946.

The top Fulbright-producing institutions are highlighted in the Feb. 18 online edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education

 

UMD Creates Online Tour Commemorating African-American History and Contributions to Campus

February 21, 2018
Contacts: 

Jessica Jennings, 301-405-4618

COLLEGE PARK, Md. - The Office of Diversity and Inclusion at the University of Maryland has created a new online tour exploring the history of African-Americans at the university and their contributions to the campus community. The tour, which features 17 locations on campus, is available at umd.edu/blackhistorytour.  

Photo of nyumburu cultural centerIn telling the history of the African American experience on campus, the tour begins with the university’s founding when Maryland was a slave-holding state. It charts the path of the legal battle to desegregate the campus led by Thurgood Marshall, civil rights advocate and the first African-American Supreme Court justice, and the trailblazers who were among the first black students to attend the university. The tour includes landmarks that celebrate the contributions of African-Americans to our campus and community, including the David C. Driskell Center, Parren J. Mitchell Art-Sociology Building, the Harriet Tubman room in Stamp Student Union, and Frederick Douglass Square.

“All of us need to learn this important history,” said University of Maryland President Wallace D. Loh. “These stories of African-American struggles and contributions span the history of our campus and our nation. We need to make hem part of our shared memory.”

“Our historical legacy is an important part of the campus climate for diversity,” said Roger L. Worthington, UMD’s chief diversity officer. “We approached Dr. Nickerson to help us with this project and planned the launch for Black History Month as a way of acknowledging the struggles of our past and charting a path forward in building a more welcoming future. The Office of Diversity and Inclusion is pleased to support this important initiative as we continue to work together toward unity, respect and inclusion.”

The tour was developed using the expertise of Kim Nickerson, assistant dean, equity administrator and diversity officer in the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences, who took a critical look at the university’s history to identify and curate key moments that were shaped by African-Americans. The tour draws on university archives, reports by campus colleagues and other sources.

“Like our country, the University of Maryland is continuously evolving to live up to our core values and ideals. The evolution includes telling a more complete history of our campus by acknowledging the painful past, but also celebrating the triumphs,” said Nickerson. “We hope this work serves as a source of affirmation and inspiration and that it invites other diverse voices to share their stories.”  

Guided tours will be offered later this spring, which are being developed by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and UMD doctoral student Nana Brantuo.   

The University of Maryland is committed to creating a safe and inclusive campus for its entire community. In addition to longstanding programs on diversity, the university has invested millions into new trainings and initiatives, including hiring a hate-bias response program manager and implementing a streamlined protocol for hate-bias incident response, rolling out a campus-wide climate survey, and launching the Center on Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education. In addition, the university is comprehensively reviewing policies through a task force with the goal of shaping a more equitable, diverse and inclusive campus.  

 

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About the University of Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

UMD Awarded $1.4 Million to Design New Treatment for PCBs, Heavy Metals in Stormwater

February 19, 2018
Contacts: 

Anjanette Riley, 301-405-2057

COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Environmental engineers at the University of Maryland (UMD) were recently awarded a $1.4 million grant from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) to design a modular stormwater treatment system for Department of Defense (DoD) sites. Conducted over three years, the research will target for the removal of three environmental contaminants: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and copper.

DoD has for years worked to remove or cap contaminated sediment in waterways that receive stormwater runoff from their sites, including the Puget Sound and tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay. But the grant to UMD is among the first efforts taken by SERDP, a partnership between the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, and DoD, to remove harmful chemicals before the runoff leaves a DoD site.

The project is led by Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Assistant Professor Birthe Kjellerup. Together with co-investigator Allen P. Davis, UMD postdoctoral scholar Devrim Kaya, and several undergraduate students, along with collaborators from the University of Washington-Tacoma, Morgan State University, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Baltimore-based planning and design company Biohabitats, Kjellerup will design a treatment system ready for future field testing.

The final design could be applicable at industry sites and in communities across the country.

PAHs are created during the combustion of carbon-based materials—everything from wood to gasoline to meat—and exist in high concentrations in the coal tar sealcoat used to protect parking lots and driveways. Like PCBs, which were commonly used in electrical equipment, plastics, dyes and other industrial materials prior to being banned by Congress in 1979, this group of chemicals has been shown to cause cancer and disrupt hormone and reproductive systems in animals. Fish and other aquatic animals can also suffer neurological, reproductive, and sensory challenges when exposed to higher levels of copper.

The research team will identify wood chips, compost, and other natural media that trap these contaminants and can be layered to obtain the highest removal rates. Each layer will be chosen based on its ability to effectively treat high flows of water with minimal maintenance. DoD site managers will be able to mix and match the layers to create the optimal “treatment train” for a location’s contaminants and climate.

To boost the effectiveness and sustainability of the system, the researchers will explore ways to seed the media with microbial communities capable of immobilizing copper and biodegrading PCBs and PAHs into harmless byproducts. The team will also develop a passive sampling strategy to monitor reduction levels.

“The challenge will be creating stable biofilms for regions with different rainfall patterns so the bacterial community isn’t washed away,” said Kjellerup, adding that the project is among the first to examine how the accumulation of potentially toxic metals in a treatment system affects microbial activity.

“PCBs especially are incredibly long lasting and difficult to degrade,” said Davis. “If we are able to design a system that reliably degrades PCBs, that would increase its sustainability and extend the value of the project.”

The team will design their system using flow data and stormwater samples collected at naval installations in Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania and Washington, D.C. and at the Joint Base Lewis-McChord near Tacoma, Washington. As a first step, they will measure PCB, PAH, and copper concentrations and map the relationship between contaminant loads and the sizes of particulate matter.

Throughout the testing and design process, researchers will work closely with engineers at Biohabitats, who have successfully implemented large-scale, nature-based treatment systems throughout the country, to ground-test findings and ensure that the final design is cost effective and aligns with industry best practices.

“We hope this project can be a seed that grows into future collaborations with the University of Maryland,” said Christopher Streb, an ecological engineer and bioworks practice leader at Biohabitats. “Stream restoration, living shoreline work, or any other landscape modifications for ecological services would benefit from a closer relationship between academia and practitioners.”

 

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About the University of Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

 

 

Two UMD Science Majors Win Prestigious Churchill Scholarships

February 13, 2018
Contacts: 

Abby Robinson, 301-405-5845

COLLEGE PARK, Md. -- Two seniors at the University of Maryland have been awarded 2018 Winston Churchill Scholarships, which offers full funding to pursue one-year master’s degrees at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. 

The scholarship—valued at $50,000 to $60,000—covers all educational fees and provides living and travel allowances. Nationally, 15 students in the sciences, engineering or mathematics receive Churchill Scholarships annually. Since its inception in 1963, only two UMD students previously received the award, and this is the first time two were selected in the same year. Both UMD students are enrolled in the university’s College of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences (CMNS). 

Photo of Christopher Bambic

Christopher Bambic—a physics and astronomy dual-degree student, who is a Stamps Banneker/Key Scholar and a member of the University Honors program within the Honors College—will pursue a Master of Philosophy degree in astronomy. He plans to study the connection between microscale plasma physics and macroscale astrophysical phenomena.

 

 

 

Photo of Yousuf Khan

Yousuf Khan—a biological sciences major specializing in cell biology and genetics, who is a Banneker/Key Scholar and a member of the Integrated Life Sciences program within the Honors College—will pursue a Master of Philosophy degree in pathology. He plans to study programmed ribosomal frameshifting in eukaryotic organisms. This mechanism allows organisms to pack a larger amount of genetic information into a relatively short sequence of RNA.

 

 

Following their time in Cambridge, both Bambic and Khan plan to pursue doctoral degrees in the United States and ultimately pursue academic careers.

“We are extremely proud of Christopher and Yousuf, who have both managed to combine excellent academic records with outstanding research achievements,” said Gerald Wilkinson, interim dean of CMNS. “They are superb representatives of the college. Their success in such a prestigious competition is testimony to their abilities and the education they have received at the University of Maryland.”

For more information on Bambic and Khan, please visit https://go.umd.edu/fhu

 


Photo credit: Faye Levine

 

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About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

UMD Researchers Find Gene that May Greatly Increase Strawberry Production

February 13, 2018
Contacts: 

Samantha Watters, 301-405-2434

COLLEGE PARK, MD. – Researchers at the University of Maryland have identified and isolated a gene that is directly involved in the way strawberry plants grow, spread and produce fruit. 

With the ability to turn this gene on and off to produce runners (a long horizontal stem ideal for producing young strawberry plants for sale) or flowers (ideal to produce fruit) and a greater understanding of how to control this process, this work has the potential to greatly increase strawberry productivity.

Strawberries are a $3 billion per year agricultural industry in the United States alone. However, the demand has only been growing over the years. There is infinite potential to enhance this industry further by understanding the mechanisms behind breeding and production of strawberry plants. Julie Caruana, a postdoctoral researcher, under the direction of Zhongchi Liu, affiliate professor with the department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture and professor in the department of Cell Biology and Molecular Genetics, has come significantly closer to this level of understanding by finding this gene and honing the ability to produce runners. “We know at least one gene that is definitely involved, and going forward, we can determine what other genes are involved and how they interact,” said Caruana.

There are many environmental factors that affect flowering and runnering behavior. These include temperature and day length, which is why strawberries typically produce runners in the summer months and flower in the fall, winter, and spring months. Controlling this trait and understanding the process, genetically and environmentally, is very important to the strawberry industry. “When you are trying to fruit strawberry plants, turning off runner production would really help the growers,” explains Mike Newell, Senior Faculty Specialist and Horticultural Crops Program Manager at the Wye Research and Education Center, who works with strawberry growers. “Depending  on the strawberry production system used, runner production may or may not be desirable, and they may have to be manually removed. Nurseries on the other hand would love runners so they can sell more tips to growers. Controlling this would certainly help growers and nurseries from different sides.”

This work not only has the potential to improve strawberry production with currently popular varieties and growing methods, but could increase yields even more with the popularization of different varieties that are less viable at the moment due to runner behavior. “Most strawberry plants in use today are known as June bearers, or plants that only produce berries once per year,” explained Dr. Liu. “Since strawberry plants are only kept for two years due to significant production drop off with age, farmers only get two harvests from a typical June bearer. Ever-bearers on the other hand can produce multiple harvests each year, increasing overall strawberry yield. But they are relatively unpopular at the moment for farmers and at nurseries because they are poor runner makers - it is difficult to propagate ever bearers. If we can find a way to induce runner production in ever-bearers, the market for these strawberry plants could open up, increasing strawberry yield and having major impacts on production.”

The discovery was published in Molecular Plant.

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About the University of Maryland
The University of Maryland, College Park is the state's flagship university and one of the nation's preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 40,000 students, 10,000 faculty and staff, and 280 academic programs. Its faculty includes two Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 60 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget and secures $514 million annually in external research funding. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

 

Pages

Word cloud of social tags
February 22
Research presents a new approach for harvesting rich, qualitative information on brands from user-generated social tags... Read
February 22
UMD has been listed as a top institution producing Fulbright U.S. Students and Scholars.  Read
February 21
To raise awareness of our shared history, the virtual tour explores how African-Americans have shaped our campus from... Read
February 19
Created for Department of Defense sites, the design could potentially be used by communities and industry. Read